If you liked Mason's talk at FairMormon, you'll Love this

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LookingHard
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Re: If you liked Mason's talk at FairMormon, you'll Love thi

Post by LookingHard » 23 Aug 2016, 09:07

Thanks Orson - that actually does help a bit.

Ann
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Re: If you liked Mason's talk at FairMormon, you'll Love thi

Post by Ann » 23 Aug 2016, 09:31

What if the gospel is a living creature in search of a habitat or home. It will stay awhile in any location that tries to make itself hospitable to the creature's survival. But it will move on if it can't thrive there long term. And the people in the home may still be bickering and remodeling and talking about their guest...who has left.
"Preachers err by trying to talk people into belief; better they reveal the radiance of their own discovery." - Joseph Campbell

"The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes." - Marcel Proust

"Therefore they said unto him, How were thine eyes opened? He answered and said unto them, A man that is called Jesus made clay, and anointed my eyes...." - John 9:10-11

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LookingHard
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Re: If you liked Mason's talk at FairMormon, you'll Love thi

Post by LookingHard » 23 Aug 2016, 10:09

Ann wrote:What if the gospel is a living creature in search of a habitat or home. It will stay awhile in any location that tries to make itself hospitable to the creature's survival. But it will move on if it can't thrive there long term. And the people in the home may still be bickering and remodeling and talking about their guest...who has left.
Ann, you actually made me look a lot like my avatar when reading this (except I am not QUITE that hairy). I read it 3 times and it is still making me think. Hmm.

Roy
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Re: If you liked Mason's talk at FairMormon, you'll Love thi

Post by Roy » 23 Aug 2016, 15:10

There was a time when I found comfort in certainty. I remember telling a friend in HS that if all beliefs were equally valid then my own beliefs would not be compelling enough to motivate me to action.

Now I have a hard time with people who are certain in their own belief because it seems like a security blanket - denying a broader reality in order to find comfort and stability.

Mason said that we have placed too many things in the truth basket.

How do we collectively remove things from the truth basket that were placed there in error?

I imagine that this is one small step towards starting that process.
"It is not so much the pain and suffering of life which crushes the individual as it is its meaninglessness and hopelessness." C. A. Elwood

“It is not the function of religion to answer all the questions about God’s moral government of the universe, but to give one courage, through faith, to go on in the face of questions he never finds the answer to in his present status.” TPC: Harold B. Lee 223

"I struggle now with establishing my faith that God may always be there, but may not always need to intervene" Heber13

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LookingHard
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Re: If you liked Mason's talk at FairMormon, you'll Love thi

Post by LookingHard » 23 Aug 2016, 16:38

Roy wrote:How do we collectively remove things from the truth basket that were placed there in error?
One way is to empty the basket and start adding things back in after some deliberation and study.

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nibbler
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Re: If you liked Mason's talk at FairMormon, you'll Love thi

Post by nibbler » 24 Aug 2016, 05:38

Roy wrote:Mason said that we have placed too many things in the truth basket.

How do we collectively remove things from the truth basket that were placed there in error?

I imagine that this is one small step towards starting that process.
I think the story about the truth cart changed the terminology but not the mindset. We talk of Truth vs. truth but that same concept can be extended to the cart, there's the Truth Cart and the truth cart. Don't get me wrong, I think it's vital to revisit what should be in the Truth Cart and what shouldn't but there will always be tension associated with the mindset that there is a universal Truth Cart that's enforceable on everyone.
Wherefore, I said unto you, feast upon the words of Christ; for behold, the words of Christ will tell you all things what ye should do.
— I dunno, Nephi?

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LookingHard
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Re: If you liked Mason's talk at FairMormon, you'll Love thi

Post by LookingHard » 24 Aug 2016, 05:46

So let me ask this about this shopping cart analogy. Why do so many Mormon truth cars pull to the right (politically) and squeak about how the world is just so bad and wicked?

Not looking for a reply. :smile:

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Shawn
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Re: If you liked Mason's talk at FairMormon, you'll Love thi

Post by Shawn » 28 Aug 2016, 08:19

From the presentation:
Apologetics can be broadly defined as “the attempt to integrate faith and reason in making a rational case for belief.” It has a long and distinguished history in both Christianity and Mormonism (and in other religions as well).
People have got to stop saying things like that if they want us to be considered Christians.

Old-Timer
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Re: If you liked Mason's talk at FairMormon, you'll Love thi

Post by Old-Timer » 28 Aug 2016, 09:21

Yep. "...including..." would have been much better than "and".
I see through my glass, darkly - as I play my saxophone in harmony with the other instruments in God's orchestra. (h/t Elder Joseph Wirthlin)

Even if people view many things differently, the core Gospel principles (LOVE; belief in the unseen but hoped; self-reflective change; symbolic cleansing; striving to recognize the will of the divine; never giving up) are universal.

"For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong." H. L. Mencken

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