Multi-generational families

Public forum to discuss questions about Mormon history and doctrine.
Roadrunner
Posts: 890
Joined: 25 Sep 2012, 15:17

Multi-generational families

Post by Roadrunner » 31 Aug 2015, 15:17

This post is about some new language contained in new Sabbath Day training: "multi-generational families". A separate thread mentioned the focus the church will put putting on Sabbath Day observance - both inside the home and at church. This emphasis comes from the 1st Presidency and the Q12 and they have provided training for bishoprics and ward councils about how to improve Sabbath Day observance.

Instead of teaching about the importance of supporting the family, the training talks about the special importance of the multigenerational family. There is even a diagram that shows baptism / conversion-> temple endowment->sealing->having children->baptism / conversion. Repeat.

I've never heard the church talk about the importance of "multi-generational families" vs. traditional "families." I appreciate the importance of having kids (heck I have several) and it seems like a subtle but important shift in focus. I wonder if we'll hear more about it in the near future.

Am I imagining this? Anyone else notice multi-generational families verbiage?

User avatar
LookingHard
Posts: 2950
Joined: 20 Oct 2014, 12:11

Re: Multi-generational families

Post by LookingHard » 31 Aug 2015, 17:00

Roadrunner wrote:This post is about some new language contained in new Sabbath Day training: "multi-generational families". A separate thread mentioned the focus the church will put putting on Sabbath Day observance - both inside the home and at church. This emphasis comes from the 1st Presidency and the Q12 and they have provided training for bishoprics and ward councils about how to improve Sabbath Day observance.

Instead of teaching about the importance of supporting the family, the training talks about the special importance of the multigenerational family. There is even a diagram that shows baptism / conversion-> temple endowment->sealing->having children->baptism / conversion. Repeat.

I've never heard the church talk about the importance of "multi-generational families" vs. traditional "families." I appreciate the importance of having kids (heck I have several) and it seems like a subtle but important shift in focus. I wonder if we'll hear more about it in the near future.

Am I imagining this? Anyone else notice multi-generational families verbiage?
I have not noticed it yet, but it sounds like "Dynasty".

User avatar
nibbler
Posts: 4520
Joined: 14 Nov 2013, 07:34
Location: Ten miles west of the exact centre of the universe

Re: Multi-generational families

Post by nibbler » 31 Aug 2015, 17:26

I've heard the phrase multi-generational families a few times in recent months. I don't know the phrase origins but google likes to hone in on a devotional in Sydney Australia where Elder Bednar was reported to have said:
Multi-generational families in the Church are essential. If we don’t have them then every generation in the Church is brand new. Most likely to interrupt that cycle is a lack of gospel learning in the home. Learn the gospel and then teach it to your families. Teach them to honour their covenants and live faithfully.
Incidentally that quote, or something similar may be the one that has created some buzz about Bednar saying something that was interpreted to mean children fall away from the church because of weak gospel teaching in the home.

There was also a talk given by Elder Bednar in a video as a part of the training material for observing the Sabbath but as far as I know it's not a public video. No links.

I view the phrase multi-generational family as a rebranding of teachings that have existed in the church for a very long time. Hinckley phrased the same concept in the following words:
Gordon B. Hinckley wrote:Never permit yourself to become a weak link in the chain of your generations.
Isn't the ultimate goal of temple work to seal all of mankind into one large family? That's why I view "multi-generational families" as another way to shine light on the same object from a different angle, give it a new buzz word to reignite interest and to keep the dialog fresh.
Cure sometimes, treat often, comfort always.
— Hippocrates

User avatar
hawkgrrrl
Site Admin
Posts: 3537
Joined: 22 Oct 2008, 16:27

Re: Multi-generational families

Post by hawkgrrrl » 31 Aug 2015, 17:31

Bednar's flowchart is all about MLMs, I mean MGFs.

User avatar
mom3
Posts: 4077
Joined: 02 Apr 2011, 14:11

Re: Multi-generational families

Post by mom3 » 01 Sep 2015, 10:55

My first response - "REALLY?"

If history has any application -
God lost a 1/3 of his family,
Adam and Eve lost 50%,
Abraham 50%,
Jacob (Israel) was totally dysfunctional,
Christ's family was divided over him,
the Benson family divided when Benson became prophet,
converts like Fiona Givens who left her families faith to join this one.

So yeah I'm all in.
"I stayed because it was God and Jesus Christ that I wanted to follow and be like, not individual human beings." Chieko Okazaki Dialogue interview

"I am coming to envision a new persona for the Church as humble followers of Jesus Christ....Joseph and his early followers came forth with lots of triumphalist rhetoric, but I think we need a new voice, one of humility, friendship and service. We should teach people to believe in God because it will soften their hearts and make them more willing to serve." - Richard Bushman

Roy
Posts: 6217
Joined: 07 Oct 2010, 14:16
Location: Pacific Northwest

Re: Multi-generational families

Post by Roy » 01 Sep 2015, 11:21

LookingHard wrote:I have not noticed it yet, but it sounds like "Dynasty".
I agree that the church needs to be careful with this emphasis. Yes, there are a number of core families that have provided an inordinate amount of leadership in the church. Yes, this is probably replicated at the local level - and yet it does come off as snobbish.

Better I think to focus on converts, how each one of us are valued for who we are not where we come from, and that each can be a pioneer in their own way.
"It is not so much the pain and suffering of life which crushes the individual as it is its meaninglessness and hopelessness." C. A. Elwood

“It is not the function of religion to answer all the questions about God’s moral government of the universe, but to give one courage, through faith, to go on in the face of questions he never finds the answer to in his present status.” TPC: Harold B. Lee 223

"I struggle now with establishing my faith that God may always be there, but may not always need to intervene" Heber13

User avatar
LookingHard
Posts: 2950
Joined: 20 Oct 2014, 12:11

Re: Multi-generational families

Post by LookingHard » 01 Sep 2015, 13:38

Roy wrote:
LookingHard wrote:I have not noticed it yet, but it sounds like "Dynasty".
I agree that the church needs to be careful with this emphasis. Yes, there are a number of core families that have provided an inordinate amount of leadership in the church. Yes, this is probably replicated at the local level - and yet it does come off as snobbish.

Better I think to focus on converts, how each one of us are valued for who we are not where we come from, and that each can be a pioneer in their own way.
My dad (kind of TBM) used to tell me that callings in the church come from revelation, relations, and desperation.

Image

That fit into this topic in more ways than I thought when I first linked it in. I got my own joke (after a few seconds or so)

amateurparent
Posts: 953
Joined: 19 Jan 2014, 20:43

Re: Multi-generational families

Post by amateurparent » 01 Sep 2015, 16:53

Things that annoy me:

1. Family Dynasty and Empire Building in the church.

2. Guys who make lots of money and move to SLC because they are certain geography is the only thing holding them back from a GA calling.

3. Multigenerational families -- defined as "add more family guilt on your children when they think about leaving or questioning the church."
I have no advance degrees in parenting. No national credentials. I am an amateur parent. I read, study, and learn all I can to be the best parent possible. Every time I think I have reached expert status with one child for one stage in their life, something changes and I am back to amateur status again. Now when I really mess up, I just apologize to my child, and explain that I am indeed an amateur .. I'm still learning how to do this right.

User avatar
DarkJedi
Posts: 7317
Joined: 24 Aug 2013, 20:53

Re: Multi-generational families

Post by DarkJedi » 01 Sep 2015, 20:06

I was actually a bit befuddled by that part of the training. The discussion in our council ended up revolving around temple work and somehow being linked to ancestors who were members of the church give us a legacy which would more likely keep people active. It was pointed out that almost everybody who lives in our stake is a first or second generation Mormon, with few third generations and very few others (Utah transplants - and they don't tend to transplant here for the long haul). We sort of reached a consensus that this part didn't apply to us as much, but that we should try to build those relationships anyway and as we age and have grandchildren, etc., it will eventually come. What I really observe happening is the children grow, go to BYU, marry a Utahns (or other Corridor residents), stay in the Corridor, and the parents eventually retire there to be closer to their grandchildren. A counselor in our bishopric just announced they are going to become snow birders to southern Utah for that very reason.

Of course there is something many of use here are all too familiar with as well - grandparent induced guilt.
In the absence of knowledge or faith there is always hope.

Once there was a gentile...who came before Hillel. He said "Convert me on the condition that you teach me the whole Torah while I stand on one foot." Hillel converted him, saying: That which is despicable to you, do not do to your fellow, this is the whole Torah, and the rest is commentary, go and learn it."

My Introduction

User avatar
SunbeltRed
Posts: 349
Joined: 20 Jun 2014, 11:07

Re: Multi-generational families

Post by SunbeltRed » 02 Sep 2015, 09:33

Perhaps MGF's have become the focus because they realize that convert baptisms in the West are hitting a wall and will probably continue to decrease (as a %of population) over the next many years. Thus, how do we keep what we have? How to attempt to stem the tide of return missionaries leaving the church? Patrol the borders, talk about dynasty, lay on guilt and shame at increasing levels.

I'm just not seeing how this is going to appeal to people or help, but I'm not very smart and cannot see the future, so I don't know seems to be a common answer I give a lot these days.

Post Reply