What if I'm wrong?

Public forum for those seeking support for their experience in the LDS Church.
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SilentDawning
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Joined: 09 May 2010, 19:55

Re: What if I'm wrong?

Post by SilentDawning » 08 Oct 2014, 06:23

Live a Good Life.jpg
For me, this quote from Marcus Aurellius says it all...he basically applied a concept used in business called sensitivity analysis. You identify likely scenarios in the future, assess the consequences, and then make an overall judgment about risk.
Live a Good Life.jpg (63.94 KiB) Viewed 581 times
For me, this quote from Marcus Aurellius says it all...he basically applied a concept used in business called sensitivity analysis. You identify likely scenarios in the future, assess the consequences, and then make an overall judgment about risk.
"It doesn't have to be about the Church (church) all the time!" -- SD

"The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. No price is too high to pay for the privilege of owning yourself."

A man asked Jesus "do all roads lead to you?" Jesus responds,”most roads don’t lead anywhere, but I will travel any road to find you.” Adapted from The Shack, William Young

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SunbeltRed
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Re: What if I'm wrong?

Post by SunbeltRed » 08 Oct 2014, 06:50

:smile: :clap:

Roy
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Joined: 07 Oct 2010, 14:16
Location: Pacific Northwest

Re: What if I'm wrong?

Post by Roy » 08 Oct 2014, 09:13

I am driving my kids and an LDS neighbor girl to an event.

The neighbor girl asks if she can ask me some religion questions. She asks me if God made everything who made God. I reply that the traditional Christian answer is that God has always existed and has always been God. My eight year old daughter suggested that maybe God was born as a star that later became sentient. I told them that was also a good theory. I then told them about the Lorenzo Snow couplet that suggests that God was once human and would have been created by His Heavenly Parents.

Then the kids became distracted by the ice cream store we were passing. :eh:

These are all good possibilities that are fun to think about and might be meaningful for us as individuals. They are also very possibly spectacularly wrong. Even the part about the Lorenzo Snow couplet isn't church doctrine because so little has been revealed on the subject. This is another way to say that "we just don't know."
West wrote:I still wonder sometimes if I've got it wrong and if I'll die and reach the afterlife and look around and go, hmm, you know, I was completely off on this. But it's more a curiosity now rather than a fear. The beliefs I've redefined for myself post-FC have really helped me a lot in getting to this state of mind.
I like that even within Mormonism our doctrine does not claim to know what heaven will be like. We believe that there is much that has not yet been revealed. We believe in whole books of scripture that have been sealed up. We believe in 10 tribes with their own prophets and prophecies that we have not had access to. We don't know what Jesus or HF look like. We don't know the living situation - what it might mean to be an eternal family in the eternities - do we all share one big house? The list goes on and on.

So I figure that EVERYONE will be surprised in the afterlife and be allowed to adjust/adapt and not be forever restricted for not being 100% right. The only question then becomes the degree of surprise and how quickly we can recover. It seems to me that being certain about things is the least prepared and flexible position to be in because it is the most resistant to growth and exploration.

I believe that God will work with each of his children for an infinite length of time to help them become their ultimate self. It seems reasonable, if God doesn't force people to abandon their previosly held notions, that those that are most convinced of their own rightness will grow at the slowest rate.
"It is not so much the pain and suffering of life which crushes the individual as it is its meaninglessness and hopelessness." C. A. Elwood

“It is not the function of religion to answer all the questions about God’s moral government of the universe, but to give one courage, through faith, to go on in the face of questions he never finds the answer to in his present status.” TPC: Harold B. Lee 223

"I struggle now with establishing my faith that God may always be there, but may not always need to intervene" Heber13

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NewLight
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Re: What if I'm wrong?

Post by NewLight » 09 Oct 2014, 04:56

Hi meggle,

I can't refrain from responding since you are referring to me as a “wise one” :lol:

Seriously though, I look at it the way SunbeltRed does, but I will admit that is something I won't say in a Sunday School lesson. The God I have come to know doesn't hang around the classroom holding a wooden ruler pacing and looking for somebody to whack on the hand.

It helps me to have been a parent of three now grown daughters and to put that experience into the context of the LDS belief (though not overly taught, by any means) that God was once like us. If that is the case, then he probably had similar experiences that I have had raising my girls and I simply won't stop loving them, even if they make a mistake, do something I disagree with, or stumble as they strive to reach their potential. I won't want to eliminate them from my life either -- EVER.

An experience comes to mind that we fondly laugh about together now that my oldest daughter is a married adult. In her middle and high school years, I would help her with her math and we would get into knock down, drag out fights as I tried teaching her some of the concepts. Looking back, it was pretty funny, though stressful at the time. Needless to say, she did not grow up to be an engineer, but she has a job she loves working with kids that attend a Boys and Girls in the community she lives in. It's wonderful to me that she has a job where she is helping people.

Her younger sister just started college this fall and got a third piercing in her ear. Seriously, did I really care about that when I saw her singing children's songs to her older sister who has a disability this last weekend when she came for a visit?

I think God loves us a lot more than we realize and he's not the disciplinarian that some preach in Mormonism. At least those are the feelings I get when I pray and try to reach out to him. I seriously think his plan is a lot bigger than our little church.

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nibbler
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Location: Ten miles west of the exact centre of the universe

Re: What if I'm wrong?

Post by nibbler » 09 Oct 2014, 05:49

Sorry for the thread jack but the discussion shook something loose in my brain, now it has a healthy little rattle to it...

We extract meaning in viewing our relationship with god as that of a parent/child relationship. Society's attitude towards children has shifted over the centuries and I'm sure that has an impact on how we view our relationship with god.

The children are seen but are not heard god may be a very different god than the god of today.
Cure sometimes, treat often, comfort always.
— Hippocrates

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SunbeltRed
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Re: What if I'm wrong?

Post by SunbeltRed » 09 Oct 2014, 06:37

NewLight wrote:Hi meggle,



Seriously though, I look at it the way SunbeltRed does, but I will admit that is something I won't say in a Sunday School lesson.

Haha, me neither. I have wondered what would happen if I did...probably released from my calling for sure.

Roy,

Interesting thought. I have some further ideas on it, but perhaps they should get their own thread as not to derail this one.

-SBRed

meggle
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Joined: 23 Aug 2013, 00:45

Re: What if I'm wrong?

Post by meggle » 09 Oct 2014, 23:06

Thanks all for taking the time to reply....it's good to get other perspectives as I chew on these things...Roy, love the fact that our doctrine allows for a lot of uncertainty- but man, I sure wish that was acknowledged more often! And NewLight, yeah, the parenting thing is partially what brought me to where I am...when your kids don't fit that traditional mold, and yet you still love them so much and think they are awesome people (nose rings and all), it kinda gives you a new take on the whole "god as the ultimate loving parent" thing.
Anyhow, thanks for holding my (virtual) hand through the uncertainty!

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