Would you ever intentionally lie?

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Roy
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Re: Would you ever intentionally lie?

Post by Roy » 16 Aug 2020, 17:32

Minyan Man wrote:
16 Aug 2020, 11:19
Or, she will continue the conversation
and say: "Just apologize & say you'll never do it again". The temptation is to apologize for something I haven't
done (lie) and hope that satisfices her.
If someone were to ask me if God exists or if we will ever see our loved ones again I would respond in the affirmative with more confidence than is inside my heart. That is a lie of sorts to provide comfort.
What you have described is something different altogether. I would never admit to what I hadn't done. I would be fearful that once admitted to, the suspicions and paranoia would become validated and be reborn with a vengeance.
"It is not so much the pain and suffering of life which crushes the individual as it is its meaninglessness and hopelessness." C. A. Elwood

“It is not the function of religion to answer all the questions about God’s moral government of the universe, but to give one courage, through faith, to go on in the face of questions he never finds the answer to in his present status.” TPC: Harold B. Lee 223

"I struggle now with establishing my faith that God may always be there, but may not always need to intervene" Heber13

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nibbler
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Re: Would you ever intentionally lie?

Post by nibbler » 16 Aug 2020, 18:50

Minyan Man wrote:
16 Aug 2020, 11:19
My conclusion is: I can't lie for something I haven't done just to appease someone who is sick.
If I did, it has the potential to make this problem bigger than it already is. Thanks for listening.
Roy wrote:
16 Aug 2020, 17:32
What you have described is something different altogether. I would never admit to what I hadn't done. I would be fearful that once admitted to, the suspicions and paranoia would become validated and be reborn with a vengeance.
Yeah, I agree with Roy.

I did want to offer an example of a scenario where you might lie to appease someone that's sick. If someone has Alzheimer's or dementia and is asking after a deceased relative, it's usually best to validate them. Say something like, "They're on a trip and will be back in a few days." as opposed to trying to explain to them that their relative is dead.

If you tell them the truth it might reinitiate the grieving process or you might end up in an argument about reality. Not really productive, as you'll just have the same conversation the next day.

But that's a totally different scenario.

And typically people lie to get out of trouble, not lie to get into trouble. ;)
Cure sometimes, treat often, comfort always.
— Hippocrates

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