Tithing: a Costly Leap of Faith

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Roy
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Re: Tithing: a Costly Leap of Faith

Post by Roy » 23 May 2013, 15:53

Shawn,

I just have a few observations that pop out to me from the quotes provided (and general experiences) but I'm not sure that you see it the same way.

1) The understanding and teaching of tithing has changed over time.
2) The current general understanding of most active members and local leadership is that an honest tithe represents 10% of gross.
3) The official church statement of tithing leaves the door open to other interpretations and introspection.
4) While the official statement doesn't clarify much between gross or net, it does seem to discourage a surplus based approach.

Do you disagree with any of these points?
"It is not so much the pain and suffering of life which crushes the individual as it is its meaninglessness and hopelessness." C. A. Elwood

“It is not the function of religion to answer all the questions about God’s moral government of the universe, but to give one courage, through faith, to go on in the face of questions he never finds the answer to in his present status.” TPC: Harold B. Lee 223

"I struggle now with establishing my faith that God may always be there, but may not always need to intervene" Heber13

Curt Sunshine
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Re: Tithing: a Costly Leap of Faith

Post by Curt Sunshine » 23 May 2013, 16:12

Roy, I agree that what you spelled out is the common understanding of most members and leaders - but I appreciate Shawn providing all of those quotes. I have no problem with anyone who interprets tithing in the way laid out in the quotes or any other way that is according to their own sincere understanding - with exceptions I could imagine.

I pay on net income and would never consider paying on gross. If it never hits my accounts, it never was mine - so why would I pay tithing on it? That's my philosophy, at least.
I see through my glass, darkly - as I play my saxophone in harmony with the other instruments in God's orchestra. (h/t Elder Joseph Wirthlin)

Even if people view many things differently, the core Gospel principles (LOVE; belief in the unseen but hoped; self-reflective change; symbolic cleansing; striving to recognize the will of the divine; never giving up) are universal.

"For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong." H. L. Mencken

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Shawn
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Re: Tithing: a Costly Leap of Faith

Post by Shawn » 23 May 2013, 16:27

I've realized there are problems with what I posted. First, the quote by Franklin Richards is totally irrelevant because he was talking about only one part of the law - the payment of surplus property upon coming to Zion. Also, Brother Talmage's example doesn't necessarily support the surplus theory. It could be that those who would pay nothing literally had NO income.

I confess I have spent hours reading about tithing from JOD and other sources today. I am wide open at this point.

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Shawn
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Re: Tithing: a Costly Leap of Faith

Post by Shawn » 23 May 2013, 16:34

Roy wrote:Shawn,

I just have a few observations that pop out to me from the quotes provided (and general experiences) but I'm not sure that you see it the same way.

1) The understanding and teaching of tithing has changed over time.
2) The current general understanding of most active members and local leadership is that an honest tithe represents 10% of gross.
3) The official church statement of tithing leaves the door open to other interpretations and introspection.
4) While the official statement doesn't clarify much between gross or net, it does seem to discourage a surplus based approach.

Do you disagree with any of these points?
1) Yeah, this is true. It's what I am studying.
2) I wouldn't say most understand a full tithe to be on gross. It seems that net is widely accepted.
3)Agree
4) Yes, it actually does seem the surplus approach is not supported. The applicable meanings of interest, increase, surplus, and income are debatable. I'll let you know what I glean from my massive, wasting-my-time study.

Roy
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Re: Tithing: a Costly Leap of Faith

Post by Roy » 23 May 2013, 17:36

Shawn wrote:1) Yeah, this is true. It's what I am studying.
2) I wouldn't say most understand a full tithe to be on gross. It seems that net is widely accepted.
3)Agree
4) Yes, it actually does seem the surplus approach is not supported. The applicable meanings of interest, increase, surplus, and income are debatable. I'll let you know what I glean from my massive, wasting-my-time study.
Cool, thanks for the perspective!
"It is not so much the pain and suffering of life which crushes the individual as it is its meaninglessness and hopelessness." C. A. Elwood

“It is not the function of religion to answer all the questions about God’s moral government of the universe, but to give one courage, through faith, to go on in the face of questions he never finds the answer to in his present status.” TPC: Harold B. Lee 223

"I struggle now with establishing my faith that God may always be there, but may not always need to intervene" Heber13

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On Own Now
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Re: Tithing: a Costly Leap of Faith

Post by On Own Now » 24 May 2013, 08:05

Shawn wrote:I'll let you know what I glean from my massive, wasting-my-time study.
Haha... Shawn, Thanks for the study and quotes you've provided (and may still provide). I simply will say that that is part of the problem. It shouldn't be something that requires laborious study of JOD, Millenial Star, or letters from the FP. Information available to the rank-and-file member is conflicting, except for the FP letter. That letter offers very good guidance. While it doesn't provide a definition of what tithing is, it does clearly say that it's up to the individual to determine what is appropriate... problem is that that letter is not accessible to average church members via any church source.

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DevilsAdvocate
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Re: Tithing: a Costly Leap of Faith

Post by DevilsAdvocate » 24 May 2013, 09:27

Shawn wrote:
For your guidance in this matter, please be advised that we have uniformly replied that the simplest statement we know of is that statement of the Lord himself that the members of the Church should pay one-tenth of all their interest annually, which is understood to mean income. No one is justified in making any other statement than this. We feel that every member of the Church should be entitled to make his own decision as to what he thinks he owes the Lord, and to make payment accordingly. -- First Presidency Letter, March 19, 1970
I would point out the facts that have been outlined and explain that anyone who pays more than 10% of their surplus annually is making a donation beyond what is required, and that is their choice.
To me this First Presidency letter basically shows that Church leaders don't really know themselves the best way to interpret what these "revelations" are supposed to mean and they are mostly just depending on established traditions and scriptures inherited from previous generations for most of their teachings. Why didn't they just pray for a new revelation to clarify exactly what interest is supposed to mean? If they have been collecting more money from members than they really should year after year that seems like a pretty big thing to get wrong. Personally I don't see how gross or net income adds up to any kind of legitimate "interest" or "increase" for most people.

Once people pay for their mortgage/rent, car payments, cable, phone, and internet bills, food, and other basic living expenses any real increase is likely to be a small fraction of their gross or net income and many are barely breaking even or actually falling further and further into debt. Of course, because the current tithing interpretation doesn't really add up fairly and is such a huge amount of money for the average member Church leaders are basically counting on divine intervention to make it right and we hear stories and suggestions about the idea that if you don't feel like you can afford to pay a full tithe then you should just go ahead and pay it anyway and somehow everything will magically work out for the best. That's easy for them to say when they don't have to live with the results of decisions like this for many average Church members all the way to their final conclusion.
"Truth is what works." - William James

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Ilovechrist77
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Re: Tithing: a Costly Leap of Faith

Post by Ilovechrist77 » 24 May 2013, 12:53

OK. Something doesn't make sense about tithing here. The leaders in the wards and stakes where I live have always told me that paying tithing can be based on gross or net income. No wonder way too many of us have faith crises. Too much confusion.

Curt Sunshine
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Re: Tithing: a Costly Leap of Faith

Post by Curt Sunshine » 24 May 2013, 13:21

Most leaders understand tithing as being based on income, and most of them understand it can be gross or net - decided by the member paying it.

Fwiw, I know there are hardcore "grossers" :P , but I have never been asked by a leader if I pay on gross or net - and I've been paying tithing as an adult for a long time.
I see through my glass, darkly - as I play my saxophone in harmony with the other instruments in God's orchestra. (h/t Elder Joseph Wirthlin)

Even if people view many things differently, the core Gospel principles (LOVE; belief in the unseen but hoped; self-reflective change; symbolic cleansing; striving to recognize the will of the divine; never giving up) are universal.

"For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong." H. L. Mencken

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Shawn
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Re: Tithing: a Costly Leap of Faith

Post by Shawn » 29 May 2013, 12:22

Here's a list of quotes in chronological order. For each one, the reference is listed before the quote. I kept some context in some of the quotes, but I wanted to keep each one as short as possible. I underlined some phrasess. What can be surmised from all of these regarding surplus, interest, increase, and income? First, I just want to say I am glad someone is laughing with me :P
On Own Now wrote:
Shawn wrote:I'll let you know what I glean from my massive, wasting-my-time study.
Haha... Shawn, Thanks for the study and quotes you've provided (and may still provide).
The quotes:

Revelation given through Joseph Smith the Prophet, at Far West, Missouri, July 8, 1838
http://www.lds.org/scriptures/dc-testam ... 9?lang=eng
Verily, thus saith the Lord, I require all their surplus property to be put into the hands of the bishop of my church in Zion, For the building of mine house, and for the laying of the foundation of Zion and for the priesthood, and for the debts of the Presidency of my Church. And this shall be the beginning of the tithing of my people. And after that, those who have thus been tithed shall pay one-tenth of all their interest annually; and this shall be a standing law unto them forever, for my holy priesthood, saith the Lord.


Brigham Young et al., “Baptism for the Dead,” Times and Seasons, Vol. 3, No. 4, December 15, 1841, p. 626.
http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm/ref/co ... 46/id/9200
The Temple is to be built by tything and consecration, and every one is at liberty to consecrate all they find in their hearts so to do; but the tythings required, is one tenth of all any one possessed at the commencement of the building, and one tenth part of all his increase from that time till the completion of the same, whether it be money or whatever he may be blessed with. Many, in this place, are laboring every tenth day for the house, and this is the tything of their income, for they have nothing else.


An Epistle of the Twelve, August 15, 1844
Millennial Star Volume 5, No. 6, November 1844, page 94
http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm/ref/co ... tar/id/390
The Temple must be completed by a regular system of tithing, according to the commandments of the Lord, which he has given as a law unto this church, by the mouth of his servant Joseph...let every member proceed immediately to tithe himself or herself, a tenth of all their property and money…and then let them continue to pay in a tenth of their income from that time forth.


An Epistle of the Twelve to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in All the World, History of the Church 7:358, January 14, 1845
https://byustudies.byu.edu/hc/7/28.html
We would remind the brethren of their duty in tithing according to the laws, and commandments given through Joseph the Prophet, it is the duty of all saints to tithe themselves one-tenth of all they possess when they enter into the new and everlasting covenant; and then one-tenth of their interest, or income, yearly afterwards .


“Tithing,” Millennial Star Vol. 09, No. 1, January 1, 1847, Orson Hyde editor
http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm/ref/co ... tar/id/849
The celestial law requires one tenth part of all a man’s substance which he possesses at the time he comes into the church, and one tenth part of his annual increase ever after. If it requires all a man can earn to support himself and family, he is not tithed at all. The celestial law does not take the mother’s and children’s bread, neither ought else which they really need for their comfort. The poor that have not this world’s goods to spare, but serve and honour God according to the best of their abilities in every other way, shall have a celestial crown in the Eternal Kingdom of our Father. But the rich, and such as have this world’s goods which they can spare, without injury to themselves, or without bringing want upon themselves and upon their families, can never obtain a celestial crown unless they pay their tithing. They are not excluded, neither disfellowshipped from the church if they do not do it. We have no law to authorize us to do this; still, such as are able and do not pay their tithing, their light, like that of the foolish virgins, will go out: they will have no oil in their vessels, and consequently cannot be admitted. It, therefore, remains with every man to decide for himself whether he will seek for a celestial crown of his own free will and choice, without compulsion, or not. The poor will readily pay their tithing and more too, because tithing is not particularly required of them. The rich think that it is a hard law as a general thing, yet once in a while a rich man is caught in the gospel net, whose heart is open not only to pay his tithing, but even to sell all that he hath and give to the poor, and go forth and preach the gospel without purse or scrip. But we expect that not only our property will be tithed, but our life also, not one-tenth of it particularly, but even the whole.


JD vol. 1, p. 296
A Discourse by President Heber C. Kimball, Delivered in the Tabernacle, Great Salt Lake City, October 7th, 1852, at the General Conference.
http://journalofdiscourses.com/1/42
… none of you can have these blessings until you prove yourselves worthy, by cultivating the earth, and then rendering to the Lord the firstfruits thereof, the firstfruits of your cattle, of your sheep, and of all your increase…I presume if the brethren in this Conference will go into these valleys, and grow wheat, raise cattle, and other products of the earth, and then give one-tenth of all their increase into the Lord's storehouse; and one-tenth of all they have got now, we shall be able to set to immediately, and build a temple.


JD vol. 10 pp. 253, 268
Remarks by President Brigham Young, made in the Bowery, Great Salt Lake City, October 6, 1863.
http://journalofdiscourses.com/10/50
Has the Lord required of us to pay Tithing? He has—namely, one-tenth of our increase...The Lord gives us possessions, and he requires of us one-tenth of the increase which we make by the putting to good use the means He has placed in our hands.


JD vol. 15 pp. 16-21
Remarks by President Brigham Young, delivered in the New Tabernacle, Salt Lake City, Sunday Morning, April 28, 1872
http://journalofdiscourses.com/15/4
Here is one of our merchants—William Jennings—about whom a great many have remarks to make. Well, it is no matter about his trade. I want to say to the rest of the merchants that he has paid a good many thousand dollars tithing, more than all the rest of them put together. That is for William Jennings. We are paying our tithing in the Cooperative. I would not consent to go into the business on any other terms only that the tithing should be paid on all we made.


JD vol. 15, p. 146
Discourse by Elder George Q. Cannon, delivered in the New Tabernacle, Salt Lake City, Sunday Afternoon, Sept. 8, 1872
http://journalofdiscourses.com/15/22
...but it is given to man and he is required to obey it that he may receive the reward, and that he may acknowledge by this act—by this payment of the tenth of his increase —that all he obtains is the gift, and comes from the beneficent hand of God, and that he is dependent upon God.


JD vol. 15, p. 214
Discourse by Elder John Taylor, delivered at the 42nd Semi-Annual Conference, Salt Lake City, October 7, 1872.
http://journalofdiscourses.com/15/29
When we talk about paying our tithing, we believe that it is the duty of all who ever obeyed the Gospel of Jesus Christ to contribute one-tenth of their increase to the Lord.


JD vol. 15, p. 308
Discourse by President Orson Hyde, delivered in the 14th Ward Assembly Rooms, Salt Lake City, Sunday Afternoon, January 19, 1873
http://journalofdiscourses.com/15/38
Well, we pay our tithing. What does it consist of? One-tenth of all we possess at the start, and then ever after one-tenth of our annual income . If that be one thousand dollars per annum you pay one hundred of that in taxes to the kingdom of God.


JD vol. 15, p. 359
Discourse by Elder Orson Pratt, delivered in the 16th Ward Assembly Rooms, Salt Lake City, Sunday Afternoon, March 9, 1873
http://journalofdiscourses.com/15/45
... do they consecrate their surplus property to the Lord, placing it in the hands of the Bishop of his Church, and after that pay one-tenth of their annual income into the treasury of the Lord?


JD vol. 16, pp. 1-8
Remarks by Elder Orson Pratt, delivered at the General Conference, in the New Tabernacle, Salt Lake City, Monday Morning, April 7, 1873
http://journalofdiscourses.com/16/1
What is the law of tithing? Part of that law enjoins it upon the Saints as a duty to pay into the Lord's storehouse one-tenth of all their annual income .


JD vol. 16, pp. 40-47
Discourse by President Brigham Young, delivered in the Tabernacle, Ogden, Sunday Afternoon, May 18, 1873
http://journalofdiscourses.com/16/7
The Saints should pay the tenth of their income with glad and thankful hearts, and help to bring home the poor. We have supported and helped the poor to the amount of millions...Everybody should pay their tenth. A poor woman ought to pay her tenth chicken, if she has to draw out ten times its value for her support.


JD vol. 16, pp. 105-107
Discourse by President George A. Smith, delivered in the Bowery, Logan City, Friday Morning, June 27, 1873.
http://journalofdiscourses.com/16/14
Now, God required of Israel Tithes and offerings… Tithes meant one-tenth of all their increase …God has required of us, as he did of ancient Israel, obedience to that law…If a man has a sum of money come into his possession, whether by the manufacture of lumber, or the selling of merchandise, or by any other means, if he will pay his tenth strictly, according to the law, he has the blessing of God upon the balance, and if he will keep a strict, straightforward account with all his increase , whatever it may be, and strictly observe the law of Tithing, he will have blessings upon his head.


JD vol. 16, pp. 145-159
Discourse by Elder Orson Pratt, delivered in the Tabernacle, Ogden, Saturday Morning, August 16, 1873
http://journalofdiscourses.com/16/21
The Lord gave a commandment that the people that came up—gathered with the Saints—should consecrate, not all their property, but all their surplus property, and after they had consecrated all their surplus property, there should be a certain portion, not called surplus, which they should retain; and out of this that is not called surplus property, they should try to make an income, and if they could make an income, they should consecrate one-tenth part of that income … Say a man comes here with fifty thousand dollars and it is judged by proper authority that forty thousand is surplus. He goes to work with the remaining ten thousand and gets him a farm and home, and enters into some other business, and makes not only a sufficiency for support, but finds at the year's end that he has made a thousand dollars: he has to pay one-tenth of that, that is a hundred dollars. This is really the meaning of the word Tithing.


JD vol. 16, pp. 168-169
Discourse by President Brigham Young, delivered in the Bowery, at Paris, Oneida County, Idaho, Sunday, August 31, 1873.
http://journalofdiscourses.com/16/22
The Lord requires one-tenth of that which he has given me; it is for me to pay the one-tenth of the increase of my flocks and of all that I have , and all the people should do the same.


JD vol. 17, p. 81
Discourse by President George A. Smith, delivered at the Adjourned General Conference, held in the New Tabernacle, Salt Lake City, Sunday Afternoon, May 9, 1874.
http://journalofdiscourses.com/17/13
The real time to pay Tithing is when we have the means. When we receive money, merchandise or property, if we, in the first instance, go to Bishop Hunter and pay the tenth , making our record square with our faith, we can then use the remainder with a conscience void of offense, and we shall be blessed therein.

Men may commence reasoning on this subject, and say, “We will figure all the year, and if at the end of it we find that we have saved anything, we will pay some Tithing; but if we do not save anything, we think the Bishops ought to pay us something.” The spirit which prompts this feeling is entirely wrong , and those who come to this conclusion will, in the end, feel that if they lose a crop any year they ought to keep back their Tithing for several years after to make up that loss; but the fact is that a Tithing of what we receive from the Lord is due to him, and the residue we are entitled to use according to our best wisdom.


JD vol. 19, pp.334-336
Discourses by Bishop L. W. Hardy, Elder Erastus Snow, President John Taylor, delivered at a Meeting Held in Nephi, on Wednesday Evening, May 15, 1878.
http://journalofdiscourses.com/19/47
Bishop L. W. Hardy: Tithing is a law of God which we are required to obey, and it is binding upon all the Latter-day Saints, the poor as well as the rich. In some places the widow, who depends upon the Church for support, pays one-tenth of her income as Tithing ...It is not the amount that we pay, but it is the honest Tithing, paid willingly and in the faith and spirit of the Gospel, that the Lord requires, no matter how small it may be; and then, on the other hand, it matters not how large.

Elder Erastus Snow: And by this revelation we learned that we were required to consecrate all of our surplus property for the purposes mentioned therein, and after doing that, to pay annually one-tenth of our increase . This means increase from every source. For instance, if a man depend only upon the labor of his own hands, then one-tenth of his earnings would be his lawful Tithing. But if in addition to this he possess teams or employ other labor, then the increase of such labor should also be Tithed. Again, if he should be engaged opening up farms, building or making other improvements, thus accumulating a surplus around him, one-tenth of the increase of such property would be due, as Tithing, as well as a tenth of his labor combined. Then again, should part of his surplus property be in such a condition as to enable him to invest it in any branch of business, one-tenth of the profits arising therefrom is due as Tithing; or should he have money loaned out on interest, on every dollar so accumulated the sum of ten cents belongs to the Lord, in accordance to his law regulating the Tithing of his people; and so on, this law strictly applying to our income derived from every source.

It is not, as some verily suppose, the Tithing of what you may have left after deducting all of your expenses; or in other words, after spending all you can . There are some calling themselves Latter-day Saints who try to appease their conscience in the belief that Tithing means the tenth of what may be left after deducting all expenses, which would amount to this: “What we cannot spend we will give a tenth of that as our Tithing.” How much, my brethren and sisters, do you think the Lord would get if all of us felt and acted so? This is not the law of Tithing; all who aim to comply with it after this manner deviate from its true reading. We are required to pay the tenth of our increase, or interest, or income , which is our Tithing, and which is necessary for the general welfare in building Temples, sustaining the Priesthood, administering to the poor, etc., while we retain the nine-tenths for the sustenance of ourselves and families, etc.


JD vol 20, pp. 361-372
Discourse by Elder Lorenzo Snow, delivered at the Weber Stake Conference, held in the Tabernacle, Ogden City, October 19, 1879
http://journalofdiscourses.com/20/47
But as regards the law of tithing, it is in force upon the poor as well as the rich , and it seems that it acts almost unequally in some respects. There is a widow, whose income is ten dollars; she pays one for tithing, and then has to appeal to the Bishop for support . Here is a rich man who has an income of one hundred thousand dollars, and pays ten thousand for his tithing.


JD vol 22, pp. 42-50
Discourse by President Joseph F. Smith, delivered at Logan, Feb. 6, 1881
http://journalofdiscourses.com/22/6
God requires one-tenth of our increase to be put into his storehouse; and this is given as a standing law to all of the Stakes of Zion... I will leave that for you, however, to say in your hearts, whether you pay an honest tithing before God, or whether you pay a portion of your tithing. God knows; we cannot deceive Him.


JD vol. 23, pp. 313-314
Discourse by Elder F. D. Richards, delivered at Logan, on Saturday Afternoon, Nov. 6, 1882.
http://journalofdiscourses.com/23/36
Few, if any, in those days, who came to Nauvoo, had any surplus, and many had not a comfortable subsistence, consequently the tithing of the people on that Temple was mostly in labor as I well recollect—for I worked in the quarry every tenth day when I was not absent on missionary service. I remember very well that every man who was dependent on his daily labor went in good faith and performed the work assigned him, and it was considered and credited to him as his tithing. When brethren who had property gathered there they were tithed of their surplus property, and then after that of their increase of the residue from that time on .


JD vol. 25, pp. 296-303
Discourse by Apostle F. D. Richards, delivered in the New Stake Tabernacle, Provo, Sunday Afternoon, Aug. 30th, 1885
http://journalofdiscourses.com/26/32
Says one, "Here is a poor widow that does not owe any tithing; there is a poor brother who is lame and cannot work who does not owe any tithing." Don't they? Let us see...The Lord has instituted a means by which they may receive their blessings by the payment of their tithing. The first Thursday of every month is a Fast day, for the Saints to gather together in prayer and fasting, and to bring their offerings for the poor, that the afflicted and unfortunate may not lack for food or clothing, and the comforts of life. Now, if a poor man received one hundred pounds of flour or any other gift, it is his privilege to pay one-tenth of it as tithing, and have it credited to him on the book as a tithing payer , and in this way he pays just as much as the man who pays one hundred dollars.


Lorenzo Snow, Conference Report, October 1899, p.29
http://www.boap.org/LDS/Presidents/E-Lorenzo-Snow.txt
I plead with you in the name of the Lord, and I pray that every man, woman and child who has means shall pay one-tenth of their income as a tithing.


Joseph F. Smith, Conference Report, April 1907, p.10
http://www.boap.org/LDS/Presidents/F-Joseph-F-Smith.txt
The tithing system of the Church, so often denounced as oppressive, and as imposing an arbitrary ecclesiastical tax, is in reality a system of free-will offerings. True, the members, by the law of the Church, are under moral obligation to pay one-tenth of their interest annually. But from the very nature of the principles on which churches exist, they being voluntary associations for the fostering of spiritual life, and the achievement of moral and charitable ends—in which associations membership cannot he compelled--there is no compulsory means of collecting this or any other church revenue.


Joseph F. Smith, Conference Report, April 1910, p.8
http://www.boap.org/LDS/Presidents/F-Joseph-F-Smith.txt
There are a great many people in the Church whose names are recorded in a book,--some of you would be surprised, I am sure, to see that book, called the record of the non-tithe-payers. I believe that if all these members, whose names are recorded in the book as non-tithe-payers, would pay anything like an honest one-tenth of their interest annually into the bishop's storehouse, we would have means to build all the meeting houses in Zion, that it is necessary to build.


Heber J. Grant, Conference Report, April 1920, p.2
http://www.boap.org/LDS/Presidents/G-Heber-J-Grant.txt
When we realize that thousands of Latter-day Saints who are absolutely honest in the payment of their tithes, who look upon the obligation to pay one-tenth of all they make as sacredly as they would look upon the obligation to divide with a partner, if that partner had a one-tenth interest in their business .


Heber J. Grant, Conference Report, October 1929, p.4
http://www.boap.org/LDS/Presidents/G-Heber-J-Grant.txt
Each and every blessing that you and I enjoy comes from God. We are under obligations to him for the very breath of life, and he gives us everything that we have. He asks us to show our appreciation and acknowledge to him his goodness, by returning to the Church for its benefit and for the spreading of the gospel at home and abroad, one-tenth of that which we receive, all of which comes from him .


First Presidency Letter, March 19, 1970
For your guidance in this matter, please be advised that we have uniformly replied that the simplest statement we know of is that statement of the Lord himself that the members of the Church should pay one-tenth of all their interest annually, which is understood to mean income. No one is justified in making any other statement than this. We feel that every member of the Church should be entitled to make his own decision as to what he thinks he owes the Lord, and to make payment accordingly.
Last edited by Shawn on 29 May 2013, 13:41, edited 1 time in total.

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