Abuse Prevention Training Required to Work with Youth

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Holy Cow
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Re: Abuse Prevention Training Required to Work with Youth

Post by Holy Cow » 23 Aug 2019, 08:50

DarkJedi wrote:
22 Aug 2019, 07:21
So, while I do believe the majority will actually do the 15 minute thing, it now occurs to me that it is possible some will do it to be done and will get nothing out of it.
This may make some people's blood boil, but to be honest, I'm one of the click-through people. As soon as I heard about this training, I went to the website, opened the training, and clicked through it in about 3 minutes. I'm the assistant scoutmaster in our ward, so I've taken the Boy Scout youth training multiple times. The training on the scout website does not allow you to click-through. So, that's one way the scout's training is better than the church's training. I'm guessing that in the near future, the church will realize this and disable the ability to click-through the training without watching the whole thing.
Honestly, I believe the two-deep leadership is the most important thing we, as a church, should focus on. Putting out a quick training is nice, but it's not going to do anything to keep an abusive person from continuing to abuse. Nor will it keep a predator from targeting people. Even background checks wouldn't completely eliminate the potential for abuse. A background check would reveal what a person has done in the past, which would be very helpful; however, it can't predict what a person will do in the future. Just because a person has a clean past, that doesn't mean they won't prey on someone, given the opportunity. I believe two-deep leadership is the most effective deterrent to a predator. While this video training is a good start, it's the overly-trusting culture (to the point of being naive) that we need to work on. Most people know about the two-deep leadership rules, but many people disregard the rule because they trust the other adults in the ward, or simply out of convenience.
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Minyan Man
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Re: Abuse Prevention Training Required to Work with Youth

Post by Minyan Man » 23 Aug 2019, 12:28

On my desk is a picture of when I was a Valiant B teacher back in 1982. I'm the only adult in the picture with (4) students.
I just went through the training material & I am surprised by how thorough it is. Could it be improved? Absolutely. That's
why I think the training should be done in groups where you could have in depth questions, feedback & additional training.

A child that is abused or having problems with parents, other students or other people in Church or outside may feel comfortable
talking with an adult they trust one on one. But, they may feel uncomfortable with two adults present. I'm not sure how you
get around that. My daughter was friends with a YW leader back in the 1980's. She still is today. Whenever she comes home,
she makes a point of at least calling her on the phone. Everyone should have at least one friend they can confide in. Regardless
of your age, sex or station in life.

Havefaith
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Re: Abuse Prevention Training Required to Work with Youth

Post by Havefaith » 23 Aug 2019, 17:00

As much as that is probanly hard to here sometimes, i agree with holycow when he said some ones past cant predict the future which cant always prevent abuse. I think the two deep leadership is the a good valuable tool that can do a lot more than just doing a backgound check. Doing a backgound check wouldnt be bad but its not going to give the help like two deep leadship would do.

Curt Sunshine
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Re: Abuse Prevention Training Required to Work with Youth

Post by Curt Sunshine » 23 Aug 2019, 19:37

Holy Cow, fwiw, I have zero problem with someone who has gone through extensive training on these issues already speeding through this training.
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QuestionAbound
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Re: Abuse Prevention Training Required to Work with Youth

Post by QuestionAbound » 30 Aug 2019, 05:53

I don't know that I have much to add to the good, better, best discussion, but I wanted to share a few stories (don't know what good they will do):

1. We had a cub scout leader years ago who refused to provide her SSN for the BSA background check. The bishop said that she was a member in good standing and held a TR, so he wasn't concerned about the BSA approval. It was odd.

2.An older gentleman in our ward was accused years and years ago of inappropriate actions against a young woman. The authorities were never called (despite the fact that the YW's father was a police officer) and the family moved out of the ward. That YW is now a grown woman and is attending a different church with her children. When my husband became bishop, he checked this accused man's membership record and sure enough, there IS a red flag by the man's name. It's there when ministering assignments are made and my husband has to manually approve those assignments. This man is not to be assigned to a family with children (nor will he ever hold a primary or YM or youth SS calling). While there isn't a background check, there are red flags when something has been brought to the ward leadership's attention. This man was never brought in for church discipline. It was left at "accusation-level" only, but there is still a red flag placed there. It's better than nothing.

3. Another family in another of our wards had an issue with a young adult male primary teacher. He crossed the line with their young daughter. The family fought for punishment on the ward level, but didn't pursue it on a legal scale. It was kept very quiet and even now (decades later), neither party talks about it. However, shortly after this family moved, the young man found a teenage girl to date...and we saw a similar story with her. Her family moved as well and there was a major ward division (who did we believe? The young man or the girl?). Had ANYONE talked openly about his actions with the primary girl, this teenage girl may not have fallen victim to the same young man.

4. My husband is also a mandatory reporter for his job (and as a bishop) and I know for a fact that we have a mom of several young children who routinely looses her cool with them and is borderline emotionally abusive to a few of them (I've seen it). She is a good friend of mine, so I don't tell my husband b/c then he has to make the call, right? If he makes the call, we lose her and the family to bitterness and inactivity. The fallout from a CPS call would be devastating. Am I protecting her or am I protecting him?

5. Two-deep leadership is becoming almost essential in ANY situation with the youth. I am a seminary teacher. I was waiting in the hall by the door to the church one morning, watching for one particular student to arrive (we have 3 other teachers in the building who teach close to the outside door). I greeted kids as they came in, but I was alone in the hall with them as I did so. Apparently, I offended one of the youth with my greeting and as this youth passed the story around class, it morphed into something far worse and parents of other youth were getting concerned. I finally received a phone call from one mom blasting me for my actions. It was ugly, but because I had no other adult with me, my defense was useless.
We really are raising kids in a cultural society where they are trained to look for offense. I'm sure we've all been in situations like that. It's only getting worse.

6. If background checks were mandatory,
-how often would they be run?
-how many people would refuse to do them (for whatever reason) and, therefore, decrease the number of badly needed primary teachers?
-what would happen if someone agreed to the check, it came back dirty and the person was either released or never given a calling?
Ward members would be curious and would we be creating a state of suspicion and gossip?

Roy
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Re: Abuse Prevention Training Required to Work with Youth

Post by Roy » 30 Aug 2019, 15:07

QuestionAbound wrote:
30 Aug 2019, 05:53
2.An older gentleman in our ward was accused years and years ago of inappropriate actions against a young woman. The authorities were never called (despite the fact that the YW's father was a police officer) and the family moved out of the ward. That YW is now a grown woman and is attending a different church with her children. When my husband became bishop, he checked this accused man's membership record and sure enough, there IS a red flag by the man's name. It's there when ministering assignments are made and my husband has to manually approve those assignments. This man is not to be assigned to a family with children (nor will he ever hold a primary or YM or youth SS calling). While there isn't a background check, there are red flags when something has been brought to the ward leadership's attention. This man was never brought in for church discipline. It was left at "accusation-level" only, but there is still a red flag placed there. It's better than nothing.
Benji Schwimmer talked about this red flag in the church records. As I remember it, he was given a red flag after he confessed to some sort of consensual same sex sexual contact. It was troubling because Benji felt that it branded him forevermore and kept him from some of the more fulfilling callings that he might aspire to. In the story you share, I have several concerns: 1) authorities never called. 2) no church discipline. 3) "accusation level" still leaves a permanent mark on church records. Who decides what kind of accusation rises to the level of permanent red flag? Is there an appeal process?
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