The Value of Accumulating Luxuries

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SamBee
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Re: The Value of Accumulating Luxuries

Post by SamBee » 17 Oct 2018, 16:51

Minyan Man wrote:
15 Oct 2018, 10:44
I've always thought it would be interesting to accumulate wealth in the first part of your life & spend the last half
giving it away to worthy causes or trying to solve problems in the world. Similar to the Bill & Melinda Gates foundation.
Better maybe to have one third struggling, one third thriving and one third giving it away.

Most folk cling to wealth and getting it young can be a bad thing. In the case of Bill Gates, let's just say his road to success was not always a straight one.
DASH1730 "An Area Authority...[was] asked...who...would go to the Telestial kingdom. His answer: "murderers, adulterers and a lot of surprised Mormons!"'
1ST PRES 1978 "[LDS] believe...there is truth in many religions and philosophies...good and great religious leaders... have raised the spiritual, moral, and ethical awareness of their people. When we speak of The [LDS] as the only true church...it is...authorized to administer the ordinances...by Jesus Christ... we do not mean... it is the only teacher of truth."

Minyan Man
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Re: The Value of Accumulating Luxuries

Post by Minyan Man » 18 Oct 2018, 07:23

SilentDawning wrote:
14 Oct 2018, 11:12
I want to comment on frugality and accumulating luxuries, a spinoff from another thread. While I think it would better to just be frugal and give to the poor, accumulating luxuries does serve a purpose. And hear me out before you reject this.

For a while there, I used my earnings from a hobby to buy luxuries related to the hobby. The packages came weekly or biweekly, sometimes more frequently if small and inexpensive. And I really enjoyed the "getting". After a while, the house became cluttered. I got sick of getting rid of packaging. Some of the items broke and incurred repair expenses I hated. I found many items went unused. The act of accumulating became tiresome.

Guess what -- I'm all luxuried out. Now, the cost wasn't anywhere near the cost of a Lamborghini -- the costs of the luxuries were relatively minor as a percent of annual income. But I have little desire to accumulate luxuries. Occasionally, I get an itch when I see something beautiful, but then I think of the space it will take up, the hassle in getting rid of the box, the cost and hassle of eventually selling it when the novelty wears off...etcetera.

I'm done. And I'm truly convinced the luxuries don't provide lasting happiness. Not simply believing what I'm told on faith, but truly knowing it.
SD, you always post interesting topics. Many will leave me scratching my head for a number of days. This is one of them. This is my "come away" or conclusion from your post. Please tell me if I'm wrong. "After accumulating luxury items (or stuff), the process has run it's course, I'm done & I've
learned a lesson. The lesson is: it didn't bring me happiness & it cluttered my home." Please correct me if I'm wrong.

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SilentDawning
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Re: The Value of Accumulating Luxuries

Post by SilentDawning » 19 Oct 2018, 16:04

Minyan Man wrote:
18 Oct 2018, 07:23
SD, you always post interesting topics. Many will leave me scratching my head for a number of days. This is one of them. This is my "come away" or conclusion from your post. Please tell me if I'm wrong. "After accumulating luxury items (or stuff), the process has run it's course, I'm done & I've
learned a lesson. The lesson is: it didn't bring me happiness & it cluttered my home." Please correct me if I'm wrong.
Thanks, I will take it as a complement (the head scratching part).

You basically have it. I would modify it this way:

"After accumulating luxury items (or stuff), the process has run it's course, I'm done & I've
learned a lesson. The lesson is: the "getting" of luxuries brought me temporary happiness in the getting, but now I'm sick of the items I don't use, and it cluttered my home."

I have to confess, I still get urges now and then, but all I have to do is think about the clutter, what it will take to deal with all the stuff if I move, and more. And then I stop wanting them.

Also, I'm a frugle bugle, so my luxuries are another man's chump change. Our cars are 15-20 years old, I dress cheaply, but appropriate for my work, and we take cheap vacations, if we take them at all.

There is a method of behavior modification in psychology called "the fatigue method". This where if you have a bad habit, you lessen or remove it by overdoing it. For example, if hooked on cigarettes, smoke them continuously until the point you are sick, and you never want to do it again.

I think that is part of what I'm talking about here. I had a guy on my mission who was on discipline with the church. We were talking about a new hobby sport in which he seemed to have expressed an interest. I suggested he get into it. He said 'No, I've indulged in enough vices in my life it's time to simplify -- I'm tired of my vices". I don't know what "vices' he was talking about, but he'd indulged to the point he was over it. The hassle of possessions seems to overwhelm the temporary happiness of getting...

That's kind of my point.
"It doesn't have to be about the Church (church) all the time!" -- SD

"Stage 5 is where you no longer believe the gospel as its literally or traditionally taught. Nonetheless, you find your own way to be active and at peace within it". -- SD

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. No price is too high to pay for the privilege of owning yourself."

My introduction: viewtopic.php?f=8&t=1576

Minyan Man
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Re: The Value of Accumulating Luxuries

Post by Minyan Man » 19 Oct 2018, 17:16

SD, thank you for taking my comments as a compliment. It was meant to be (a compliment).

I believe that God teaches us lessons from time to time based on the choices we make. Your example is one of those lessons for you.
There are others who accumulate just because they want to without consideration of the consequences. For example, credit card
debt. God could be yelling in their ears & they never "hear" or understand the lesson being taught. Recently, I bought a new riding
lawn mower. My neighbors commented "Mike got a new toy". To me it's a necessity not a toy. (Potato - Patato)
These are the same neighbors who own new cars or trucks, speed boats & motor cycles. None of these things ever interested me.
(maybe a new car.)

My wife said the other day, she wants to buy a new couch. I said we need to get rid of the old one first & she said no. Someone could
use it. Our basement is filled with stuff "someone" could use but is never given away or offered to Goodwill, etc. (I'm starting to rant.)
I believe this could be the accumulation of luxuries too.

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SilentDawning
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Re: The Value of Accumulating Luxuries

Post by SilentDawning » 20 Oct 2018, 21:12

Minyan Man wrote:
19 Oct 2018, 17:16
Our basement is filled with stuff "someone" could use but is never given away or offered to Goodwill, etc. (I'm starting to rant.)
I believe this could be the accumulation of luxuries too.
As you recognized, the accumulation of "things" can be unhealthy too. If you've seen that show 'Hoarders' you know what I mean. Often, the accumulation of things (and not necessarily luxuries) is some other problem lurking underneath. Depression, lingering grief over the loss of a loved one (so the grieving person hangs on to the deceased person's possessions), perhaps unhappiness in their relationships, burn-out. In those case, I guess the value of creating luxuries is found in creating a visible symptom (tip of the iceberg) that indicates change is necessary.
"It doesn't have to be about the Church (church) all the time!" -- SD

"Stage 5 is where you no longer believe the gospel as its literally or traditionally taught. Nonetheless, you find your own way to be active and at peace within it". -- SD

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. No price is too high to pay for the privilege of owning yourself."

My introduction: viewtopic.php?f=8&t=1576

Minyan Man
Posts: 1503
Joined: 15 Sep 2011, 13:40

Re: The Value of Accumulating Luxuries

Post by Minyan Man » 21 Oct 2018, 20:04

Another consideration is: do you measure your self worth by the material possessions you've accumulated?
We were recently in Utah visiting friends & family. At BYU & other places, we notices buildings with the name of
a prominent LDS family on them. Our friends told us the it was a condition of the gift that the family name
was shown on the buildings. This way it could not be mistaken who provided the funds.

Life is interesting.

This is an interesting video: Money for nothing
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6CB9OrG ... rt_radio=1

AmyJ
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Re: The Value of Accumulating Luxuries

Post by AmyJ » 22 Oct 2018, 05:37

SilentDawning wrote:
20 Oct 2018, 21:12
Minyan Man wrote:
19 Oct 2018, 17:16
Our basement is filled with stuff "someone" could use but is never given away or offered to Goodwill, etc. (I'm starting to rant.)
I believe this could be the accumulation of luxuries too.
As you recognized, the accumulation of "things" can be unhealthy too. If you've seen that show 'Hoarders' you know what I mean. Often, the accumulation of things (and not necessarily luxuries) is some other problem lurking underneath. Depression, lingering grief over the loss of a loved one (so the grieving person hangs on to the deceased person's possessions), perhaps unhappiness in their relationships, burn-out. In those case, I guess the value of creating luxuries is found in creating a visible symptom (tip of the iceberg) that indicates change is necessary.
In my case, we have too much "stuff" because our house is smaller then the amount of stuff we accumulate and I don't choose to spend my executive functioning resources in enforcing how to get it out more then I do. I haven't found a budget friendly, learning disability friendly system that allows the clutter to be "hidden" from my view but available for my differently wired visual family members who loose everything they can't see. i think that the statistical likelyhood of finding such a treasure is right up there with the odds of Willy Wonka getting the golden ticket :D

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