Wayward children of faithful LDS parents

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DarkJedi
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Re: Wayward children of faithful LDS parents

Post by DarkJedi » 09 Jul 2018, 16:06

dande48 wrote:
09 Jul 2018, 05:49
Awesome quotes Roy. I love the feeling behind them. But as a follow up question, what's the point? I mean, if this life is supposed to be a teaching experience to make us Christ-like, celestial beings, but we can all "come around" in the next life, what are we doing here? If this life is a test, but failing doesn't matter, what's the point of it?
A very plausible answer is that this life isn't a test at all. Why does God need to test us and/or why would God test us?

I subscribe to the idea this life gives us experience we may not have been able to gain in another way, but I don't believe it is a test.

PS I don't think Nephi (the first) and I would get along very well and I likewise don't think Alma and I would get along very well.

PPS Of course the actual answer is indeed 42
In the absence of knowledge or faith there is always hope.

Once there was a gentile...who came before Hillel. He said "Convert me on the condition that you teach me the whole Torah while I stand on one foot." Hillel converted him, saying: That which is despicable to you, do not do to your fellow, this is the whole Torah, and the rest is commentary, go and learn it."

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dande48
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Re: Wayward children of faithful LDS parents

Post by dande48 » 09 Jul 2018, 18:41

Roy wrote:
09 Jul 2018, 09:08
The answer is, of course, 42! ;)
DarkJedi wrote:
09 Jul 2018, 16:06
PPS Of course the actual answer is indeed 42
Douglas Adams wrote:"The answer to this is very simple. It was a joke. It had to be a number, an ordinary, smallish number, and I chose that one. Binary representations, base 13, Tibetan monks are all complete nonsense. I sat on my desk, stared in to the garden and thought 42 will do. I typed it out. End of story."
"The whole world is a comedy to those that think, a tragedy to those that feel." - Horace Walpole

"Even though there are no ways of knowing for sure, there are ways of knowing for pretty sure."
-Lemony Snicket

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Heber13
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Re: Wayward children of faithful LDS parents

Post by Heber13 » 10 Jul 2018, 09:58

DarkJedi wrote:
09 Jul 2018, 16:06
I subscribe to the idea this life gives us experience we may not have been able to gain in another way, but I don't believe it is a test.
Maybe life is kind of like University, for those who went to get a degree. There were tests at some times...but university wasn't all a big test. It wasn't all classes and reading, though it was some of that as well. It was an experience. Right?
dande48 wrote:
09 Jul 2018, 18:41
Douglas Adams wrote:
"The answer to this is very simple. It was a joke. It had to be a number, an ordinary, smallish number, and I chose that one. Binary representations, base 13, Tibetan monks are all complete nonsense. I sat on my desk, stared in to the garden and thought 42 will do. I typed it out. End of story."
Perfect response.

I wonder if much of God's response to us in the next life will be along those lines...where we all went crazy trying to figure out religion and rules and meaning and symbolism behind it all...and it was all a bit more simple, and random...because that will do in order to give us our experience here on earth.

In thinking of wayward children...if parents could accept that possibility a little more...perhaps it alleviates some stress they are so "wayward." I mean, if a parent finds out a child smokes pot...you can freak out about it...or maybe it won't matter in the end as they grow up and mature and figure out life on their own path, without fear of God striking you down with a lightening bolt.

42.

I like it. We misinterpret many things because we over complicate life. Perhaps we can learn from the dolphins who never started wars or destroyed the environment,
so long, and thanks for all the fish
Luke: "Why didn't you tell me? You told me Vader betrayed and murdered my father."
Obi-Wan: "Your father... was seduced by the dark side of the Force. He ceased to be Anakin Skywalker and became Darth Vader. When that happened, the good man who was your father was destroyed. So what I told you was true... from a certain point of view."
Luke: "A certain point of view?"
Obi-Wan: "Luke, you're going to find that many of the truths we cling to...depend greatly on our point of view."

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