Word of Wisdom - Experiment

Public forum to discuss questions about Mormon history and doctrine.
Roadrunner
Posts: 855
Joined: 25 Sep 2012, 15:17

Re: Word of Wisdom - Experiment

Post by Roadrunner » 08 Apr 2018, 07:43

Interesting article excerpt from the Apr 2 Wall Street Journal:

Psychiatrists and therapists don’t often ask this question. But a growing body of research over the past decade shows that a healthy diet—high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fish and unprocessed lean red meat—can prevent depression. And an unhealthy diet—high in processed and refined foods—increases the risk for the disease in everyone, including children and teens.

Now recent studies show that a healthy diet may not only prevent depression, but could effectively treat it once it’s started.

Cnsl1
Posts: 208
Joined: 05 Jan 2009, 01:33

Re: Word of Wisdom - Experiment

Post by Cnsl1 » 08 Apr 2018, 15:06

Roadrunner wrote:
08 Apr 2018, 07:43
Interesting article excerpt from the Apr 2 Wall Street Journal:

Psychiatrists and therapists don’t often ask this question. But a growing body of research over the past decade shows that a healthy diet—high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fish and unprocessed lean red meat—can prevent depression. And an unhealthy diet—high in processed and refined foods—increases the risk for the disease in everyone, including children and teens.

Now recent studies show that a healthy diet may not only prevent depression, but could effectively treat it once it’s started.

Oh, there are many in the mental health field well aware that diet and exercise are extremely important factors. Exercise and good food are, in fact, medicine in that they change our neurochemistry in a very real sense, similar to medicine. Sometimes a change of diet and addition of exercise is all that is needed to relieve some mental health conditions. Not always, obviously.

There are good, peer-reviewed empirical studies showing the biochemical benefits of exercise and nutrition. I'm not talking about psuedo-science claims or the MLM vitamins your aunt swears cured her cancer.

I believe that if God cares about our health, he will inspire researchers to seek answers to many questions about what helps us to walk and not be so darned weary. Unfortunately, there's a lot of different opinions and modern prophets have been pretty mute about it--just letting that old WofW health code from over 100 years ago ride, even though there isn't a Mormon I've ever met who follows it as written. So, we're forced (or blessed, depending on how you look at it) to study it out in our own, look for the most reliable sources of data, and see what works for us.

What works for me is a high protein, low carb diet. Green tea. Some black tea on occasion. Fruits, nuts, veggies, lots of spinach. Occasional alcohol. No coffee, not because I think it's necessarily bad, but because I never developed a taste for it. I think it's awful. No sodas, even though I kinda like the taste of some of them. When I limited carbs, especially bread, what little fat I had (mostly in belly area) shrunk pretty quickly. I also found I started having some aversion to bread. I just couldn't stand the texture and feel of chewed bread in my mouth, nor the thought of swallowing that into my body. Now, I've since become a little more tolerant of bread, and started eating more carbs when I increased my exercise. I was just much hungrier and couldn't always easily find the better foods. Bread is so easy and cheap. Consequently, some belly fat has returned, dang it. I try to currently keep my carbs, or most of them, at breakfast. I find I feel a little better with some complex carbs early to help give me energy. I think I'd probably do better going back to fewer carbs, but it's more difficult, not to mention more expensive, to find the right foods.

So, my interpretation of the very old and badly in need of updating WofW is that diet is very important to our physical and mental health, and a big factor in our ability to be good disciples and parents and friends. So follow the data and figure out what works.

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Beefster
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Joined: 04 Aug 2017, 18:38

Re: Word of Wisdom - Experiment

Post by Beefster » 08 Apr 2018, 16:46

I think that's a good point. Why would God inspire his spiritual leaders with medical or health information when he can get the same, or better, done by leading researchers to discover those things? In the OT it makes sense, since the Israelites wandered in the wilderness in isolation, but in JS's day, it sorta makes sense that it would only be a very basic concept.
Boys are governed by rules. Men are governed by principles.

Often I hear doubt being presented as the opposite of faith but I think certainty does a better job of filling that role. Doubts can help faith grow, certainty almost always makes faith shrink. --nibbler

Curt Sunshine
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Joined: 21 Oct 2008, 20:24

Re: Word of Wisdom - Experiment

Post by Curt Sunshine » 08 Apr 2018, 18:52

Feiw, one of my daughters switched to a diet focused on the Word of Wisdom, and it has been very good for her.

As far as generally good diet advice, particularly the focus on avoiding addiction, I really don't have any issues with the Word of Wisdom. I can accept it almost without reservation as introduced. My only deep issue is its use as a baptismal requirement, and I don't love it as a requirement for the temple - but that doesn't torque me like it does with baptism. Our conversion rate would jump significantly if that was changed, and it would give people time to work on quitting without feeling sinful for not being able to quit cold turkey immediately.
I see through my glass, darkly - as I play my saxophone in harmony with the other instruments in God's orchestra. (h/t Elder Joseph Wirthlin)

Even if people view many things differently, the core Gospel principles (LOVE; belief in the unseen but hoped; self-reflective change; symbolic cleansing; striving to recognize the will of the divine; never giving up) are universal.

"For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong." H. L. Mencken

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