Biblical Literalism

Public forum to discuss questions about Mormon history and doctrine.

Do you believe in a literal Adam and Eve, and a Global Flood?

yes
0
No votes
no
14
93%
Not sure
1
7%
 
Total votes: 15

DoubtingTom
Posts: 226
Joined: 22 Mar 2017, 12:13

Re: Biblical Literalism

Post by DoubtingTom » 29 Aug 2017, 06:15

Great response Nibbler. Seems very reasonable and much more plausible than a literal global flood event.

Also, you get two points for using the phrase "purple monkey dishwasher"

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Beefster
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Joined: 04 Aug 2017, 18:38

Re: Biblical Literalism

Post by Beefster » 29 Aug 2017, 17:36

DarkJedi wrote:
29 Aug 2017, 04:31
I believe the terms "Adam" and "Eve" are representative of all humans. I don't believe there was one Adam and one Eve, but they are representative of all humans.
I agree with this sentiment, especially with regards to the endowment. The endowment story can't be literally true because it's blatantly anachronistic. Thus, Adam and Eve are avatars for the men and women in the ceremony.

I'm not sure about my actual interpretation of the flood. I'm pretty sure it isn't literal, but the fact that it's in nearly every mythology does raise some eyebrows.

I figure things don't even remotely start getting literal until Abraham, which is probably still plagued by exaggeration and embellishment. (e.g. I would bet that Abraham was more like 40-50, not 99, when Isaac was born, and Sarah was just old enough that she could have been menopausal, so about 45) As it gets closer to the end of the OT, it gets more and more literal. I believe the NT is mostly literal, but still prone to error, of course. Time frames are probably not accurate in any way before Moses. IIRC, the Moses account places Adam at the time of Pangaea... so yeah. Probably allegory.

So far, I'm convinced at least these things are allegory (though probably loosely based on real people/places/events): Jonah, Samson, Job, the flood, all four creation accounts (Genesis, Moses, Abraham, Endowment), the Garden of Eden, Adam, Enoch, Noah, and maybe Sodom and Gomorrah.
Boys are governed by rules. Men are governed by principles.

Often I hear doubt being presented as the opposite of faith but I think certainty does a better job of filling that role. Doubts can help faith grow, certainty almost always makes faith shrink. --nibbler

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gospeltangents
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Re: Biblical Literalism

Post by gospeltangents » 29 Aug 2017, 17:59

At one time in the 19th century, there was a "poly-genesis" theory, in which there was a white Adam and Eve, black Adam & Eve, Asian Adam and Eve, etc. Paul Reeve talked about it: https://gospeltangents.com/2017/02/09/h ... -category/
See my latest interviews on Mormon History, Science & Theology at www.gospeltangents.com

Curt Sunshine
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Re: Biblical Literalism

Post by Curt Sunshine » 29 Aug 2017, 21:03

When it says in the New Testament that "all the world would be taxed", we all understand it meant "all the world controlled by the taxer".

I use that example whenever someone asks how I could think Noah's flood didn't cover the entire Earth. I simply say I am sure it covered all the Earth that was known to the people who wrote about it.

Again, reverting to Biblical population demographics, it is flat-out impossible the flood killed everyone on Earth except eight people. That might not have been understood by most people even 200 years ago, but it is crystal clear now. It was a local flood, if the story is based on an actual, historical event - which I don't doubt.

It doesn't matter what former and current leaders taught and still teach. They were and are wrong. No big deal, except they should know better by now.
I see through my glass, darkly - as I play my saxophone in harmony with the other instruments in God's orchestra. (h/t Elder Joseph Wirthlin)

Even if people view many things differently, the core Gospel principles (LOVE; belief in the unseen but hoped; self-reflective change; symbolic cleansing; striving to recognize the will of the divine; never giving up) are universal.

"For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong." H. L. Mencken

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On Own Now
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Joined: 18 Jan 2012, 12:45

Re: Biblical Literalism

Post by On Own Now » 30 Aug 2017, 08:50

Beefster wrote:
29 Aug 2017, 17:36
DarkJedi wrote:
29 Aug 2017, 04:31
I believe the terms "Adam" and "Eve" are representative of all humans. I don't believe there was one Adam and one Eve, but they are representative of all humans.
I agree with this sentiment, especially with regards to the endowment. The endowment story can't be literally true because it's blatantly anachronistic. Thus, Adam and Eve are avatars for the men and women in the ceremony.
I agree in concept, though I make an important distinction. I believe that "Adam" is representative of all humans, male and female, and that "Eve" is a foil (NPC, for you beefster), in the same way that the serpent is a foil in the Genesis story or other characters are in the endowment.
"Let us therefore no longer pass judgment on one another, but resolve instead never to put a stumbling block or hindrance in the way of another." --Romans 14:13

Roy
Posts: 4852
Joined: 07 Oct 2010, 14:16
Location: Pacific Northwest

Re: Biblical Literalism

Post by Roy » 30 Aug 2017, 09:53

On Own Now wrote:
30 Aug 2017, 08:50
Beefster wrote:
29 Aug 2017, 17:36
DarkJedi wrote:
29 Aug 2017, 04:31
I believe the terms "Adam" and "Eve" are representative of all humans. I don't believe there was one Adam and one Eve, but they are representative of all humans.
I agree with this sentiment, especially with regards to the endowment. The endowment story can't be literally true because it's blatantly anachronistic. Thus, Adam and Eve are avatars for the men and women in the ceremony.
I agree in concept, though I make an important distinction. I believe that "Adam" is representative of all humans, male and female, and that "Eve" is a foil (NPC, for you beefster), in the same way that the serpent is a foil in the Genesis story or other characters are in the endowment.
Love it! The NPC reference totally helped me understand what you meant by foil. Each of us can place ourselves as the hero or our own story. We do not need to shoot for a merely supporting role.
"It is not so much the pain and suffering of life which crushes the individual as it is its meaninglessness and hopelessness." C. A. Elwood

“It is not the function of religion to answer all the questions about God’s moral government of the universe, but to give one courage, through faith, to go on in the face of questions he never finds the answer to in his present status.” TPC: Harold B. Lee 223

"I struggle now with establishing my faith that God may always be there, but may not always need to intervene" Heber13

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