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The Role of Sharks in the Resurrection

Posted: 08 Feb 2014, 23:03
by Curt Sunshine
Okay, that title was tongue-in-cheek. ;) I am posting this here mostly as a humorous post, not as any kind of doctrinal discussion about sharks. :P

Hat hit to Sam Brunson at BCC for highlighting the following reference from Joseph Fielding Smith in the lesson for tomorrow in PH and RS regarding the resurrection. I enjoyed a chuckle, but I also liked his references to what might have caused Pres. Smith to choose sharks as one of his examples. I just like to understand the backgrounds of stories and quotes as well as possible.
Every fundamental part of every body will be restored to its proper place again in the resurrection, no matter what may become of the body in death. If it be burned by fire, eaten by sharks, no matter what. Every fundamental part of it will be restored to its own proper place.


I will add, however, that this is why I am puzzled by the inclusion of counsel in the CHI not to use cremation upon death if not mandated by law. I absolutely see that as a cultural bias that has absolutely no relevance to our doctrine or the Gospel.

Re: The Role of Sharks in the Resurrection

Posted: 08 Feb 2014, 23:10
by Thoreau
Better hope you're not a transplant recipient if the donor is resurrected before you die.

Re: The Role of Sharks in the Resurrection

Posted: 09 Feb 2014, 00:03
by Curt Sunshine
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Priceless! That might be one of the funniest comments in the history of this site. :thumbup:

Re: The Role of Sharks in the Resurrection

Posted: 09 Feb 2014, 00:06
by Harmony
The wording in the Administering of the Church is "The Church does not normally encourage cremation. The family of the deceased must decide whether the body should be cremated, taking into account any laws governing burial or cremation. In some countries, the law requires cremation."

It seems less stringent than what I first believed the church's policy was. I'm glad it is a family decision.

Re: The Role of Sharks in the Resurrection

Posted: 09 Feb 2014, 02:36
by SamBee
Thoreau, what about all those bits falling off us all the time? Do our skin flakes, loose hairs and nail clippings come back? What about our gut fauna and flora? Or the blood, mucus and saliva that's leaked out of our body from time to time?

I think this is the problem if we're too literal. I have no problem with the bodily resurrection, but I see it as our idealized body... however when it says "every hair shall be restored", I think it means one will have a full head of hair, not a monstrous impossible Afro.

ps Great title, Curtis.

Re: The Role of Sharks in the Resurrection

Posted: 09 Feb 2014, 02:38
by SamBee
Harmony wrote:The wording in the
Administering of the Church is "The Church does not normally encourage
cremation. The family of the deceased must decide whether the body
should be cremated, taking into account any laws governing burial or
cremation. In some countries, the law requires cremation."

It seems less stringent than what I first believed the church's policy
was. I'm glad it is a family decision.
Best reason not to be cremated - it's not very green at all. Creates a lot of fumes and needs a lot of energy.

However there must be circumstances where cremation is compulsory eg an extreme plague situation.

Re: The Role of Sharks in the Resurrection

Posted: 09 Feb 2014, 02:54
by nibbler
I always assumed that the suggestion not to cremate unless it was a "last resort" existed because it is harder for god to resurrect someone if they had been cremated.

:lolno:

Re: The Role of Sharks in the Resurrection

Posted: 09 Feb 2014, 03:03
by nibbler
Harmony wrote:The wording in the Administering of the Church is "The Church does not normally encourage cremation. The family of the deceased must decide whether the body should be cremated, taking into account any laws governing burial or cremation. In some countries, the law requires cremation."

It seems less stringent than what I first believed the church's policy was. I'm glad it is a family decision.
I guess I find it odd that the church feels like they get a say in the matter at all, but that's me. Seriously, why would they need to be encouraging people toward any decision regarding burial?

Re: The Role of Sharks in the Resurrection

Posted: 09 Feb 2014, 06:48
by mercyngrace
SamBee wrote: Best reason not to be cremated - it's not very green at all. Creates a lot of fumes and needs a lot of energy.

However there must be circumstances where cremation is compulsory eg an extreme plague situation.
Another good reason: It's just a nasty process.

My dad's a mortician and the details he's provided (sights, smells) are enough to make you hurl. He hates having to cremate a body. The family makes the decision then walks away. Guys like my dad are left behind to actually "make it so".

Re: The Role of Sharks in the Resurrection

Posted: 09 Feb 2014, 08:13
by SamBee
Makes it impossible to do an autopsy if needed later too.

I gather crematoria use scents to hide the revolting smell from the chimneys.

The problem here is that plots are so expensive and a lot of gravestones are knocked over by local government.