The Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad day

Public forum for those seeking support for their experience in the LDS Church.
User avatar
mercyngrace
Posts: 517
Joined: 18 Jan 2011, 12:26

Re: The Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad day

Post by mercyngrace » 20 Jan 2014, 12:40

Some days are just like that.

In our ward, sacrament meeting was okay - not particularly inspiring - but not one of those cringe worthy Sundays when I hear Twilight Zone music in my head. I spent most of the time reading scriptures. (I recommend Romans 14 - loved hat yesterday!)

Then I taught my Sunday School class and a member of the new stake presidency popped in for a visit. I was teaching atonement theory as it relates to the nature of God. Not exactly in the Come Follow Me outline. He just kept looking thoughtful and saying, "I've never heard this before." {shrug} I've got the references so if he has any questions, he knows where to find me. LOL.

RS was kind of 'meh'. The teacher is an adult convert who, although she's been a member for decades, seems to have brought a Southern Baptist hard line mentality with her. She always makes comments which reveal her to be a very black/white thinker. The lesson was on Jesus Christ and she spent a lot of time at the beginning almost defiantly explaining that it's just fine not to have an experience with Christ because even if we don't, weknow... [fill in the blank]. It felt like she was trying to bolster the Joseph Fielding Smith's prophetic call more than anything and it was a bit off-putting. I think it would have been better to just read the quote from the manual and then reaffirm that there is just as much value in believing, hoping, and exercising faith as in "knowing".

All in all. It was okay.
Her sins, which are many, are forgiven; for she loved much: but to whom little is forgiven, the same loveth little. ~ Luke 7:47

rebeccad
Posts: 290
Joined: 10 Jul 2012, 10:36

Re: The Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad day

Post by rebeccad » 20 Jan 2014, 12:48

I think the bishop was purposefully deceptive.
If asked, I'm sure he would say that he didn't say he was cured, and he's sorry if he gave that impression. What he did say is that "blood tests are cancer free". That is very good news it means he is able to receive a further treatment. But to most people, it sounded like he was saying he was cured.

Really it is days like this that make me question if I can balance all of this.
"The very same people who are good sometimes are the very same people who are bad sometimes, it's funny but it's true" -Fred Rogers

User avatar
On Own Now
Posts: 1759
Joined: 18 Jan 2012, 12:45

Re: The Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad day

Post by On Own Now » 20 Jan 2014, 13:25

rebeccad,

Those are tough days. I get what you are saying. I don't have any words of encouragement other than to say that there are many good people and many good teachings in the Church, they just don't always shine through the clutter on days like that.
- - -
“Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves.” ― Carl Jung
- - -
"Let us therefore no longer pass judgment on one another, but resolve instead never to put a stumbling block or hindrance in the way of another." ― Romans 14:13
- - -

User avatar
Eric Merrill
Posts: 27
Joined: 12 Apr 2013, 10:20
Location: Seattle, WA

Re: The Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad day

Post by Eric Merrill » 20 Jan 2014, 13:59

mackay11 wrote: Priesthood just annoyed me. JSF wrote a letter in 1948 to his son saying he had never had a vision of the Lord. But the teacher and class members kept referring to it as "at this stage he hadn't seen him" or "this was before he was prophet and he hadn't seen the Lord yet"....
Since we're all sharing, I'll go next! :) Also a blah day yesterday. We had a high counsilman speak. I heard some words like doubt thrown around so I tried to pay attention despite my young children being very effective distractions. I was disappointed as the tone went in the typical "don't you dare doubt...Let go of the rod for even a minute and satan will grab you...people are imperfect but the gospel is perfect..blah blah" I looked around and couldn't help but notice all the disinterested looks on people's faces. I'm thinking a focus on making "the gospel" more vibrant and exciting would do more good for those than a guilt trip talk for those with doubts.

Then in priesthood the lesson went the same direction as MacKay's, with the caveat that our quorum started with the assumption that JFS was NOT an apostle when he made the statement. I had to look up the date to add any weight to my view that being an Apostle does NOT require the ministration of JC.

Sigh...
"Tradition is not the same as doctrine, and I will not hold myself back for fear of offending."
"Life before death, strength before weakness, journey before destination"

User avatar
GodisLove
Posts: 114
Joined: 09 Apr 2013, 11:02

Re: The Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad day

Post by GodisLove » 20 Jan 2014, 15:11

rebeccad wrote:
Really it is days like this that make me question if I can balance all of this.
I feel like this every. single. week.

Yesterday was our Stake Conference and I spent the morning in bed playing Candy Crush and eating treats with the kids. It felt much more meaningful. Wonder how I would explain that to my local leadership.

The Hastening the Work may do me in. Sorry it stunk!
Not one Sparrow is forgotten
E'en the raven God will feed
And the lily of the valley
From His bounty hath its need

Then shall I not trust Thee, Father
In Thy mercy have a share?
And through faith and prayer, my Mother
Merit Thy protecting care?
Shaker Hymnal 1908

User avatar
DarkJedi
Posts: 7219
Joined: 24 Aug 2013, 20:53

Re: The Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad day

Post by DarkJedi » 20 Jan 2014, 20:37

I suppose if we're all sharing, my morning at home was OK, nothing to crow about. The tabernacle choir broadcast (the closest I get to a worship service) had all spiritual type music, which I don't mind. I wondered why and I guess I have to attribute it to being the day before MLK Day. Again, I don't mind, I like a good spiritual every now and then, it was just different. Rites of Passage comes on BYUTV after the tabernacle, but I turned it off after a few minutes when the "rite" was going on a mission. I have undertaken reading the New testament again, I'm still in Matthew, but I enjoyed that.

Sorry you had a bad day, rebeccad. I don't go because of days like that and probably would have had a bad day had I gone, which is sad - it really is that angst that keeps me from going. I don't want to jump on Nibbler's bandwagon, but this "Hasten the Work" thing has really taken hold in lots of places and I think much in the same way you talk about - with an interest in goals and numbers as opposed to individual salvation. I'm sure that the inventors of the program didn't mean it that way, but my observations are that it's turning out that way. IMO, qualitative analysis is much more important than quantitative analysis in this case. It's one of the things that bothers me about how we run missions, it's all about numbers and the conquering heroes are those who post the biggest numbers.

So with your bishop and the sick kid, isn't it going to become obvious at some point in the not too distant future that the kid isn't cured and does indeed still have cancer? What's he going to say then?

(BTW, I used to read Alexander's Terrible No Good Very Bad Day to my kids all the time. Good title for your post.)
Last edited by DarkJedi on 21 Jan 2014, 04:16, edited 1 time in total.
In the absence of knowledge or faith there is always hope.

Once there was a gentile...who came before Hillel. He said "Convert me on the condition that you teach me the whole Torah while I stand on one foot." Hillel converted him, saying: That which is despicable to you, do not do to your fellow, this is the whole Torah, and the rest is commentary, go and learn it."

My Introduction

Harmony
Posts: 120
Joined: 02 Sep 2013, 01:12

Re: The Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad day

Post by Harmony » 21 Jan 2014, 00:09

Sorry you had such a negative Sunday. I think your daughter should challenge the guy to a run. Or let some moms let him know that birthing children is a much harder task than a pull up, so maybe he should lay off the "weak women" topic. : ) :thumbup:

We also had a Hastening the Work sacrament meeting. Somehow I didn't let it bog me down, and I tried to find some positives. Statistics on paper seems a cold way to go about HTW, so I hope there are other things in place to help those already in the ward who could use it as well as those who are investigating.

I hope next week is better for you. Maybe have a hallway class next week with someone you get along with. It helps me break up a long Sunday.

: )

User avatar
MockingJay
Posts: 208
Joined: 14 Nov 2013, 06:56
Location: US Southeast

Re: The Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad day

Post by MockingJay » 21 Jan 2014, 06:34

Priesthood just annoyed me. JSF wrote a letter in 1948 to his son saying he had never had a vision of the Lord. But the teacher and class members kept referring to it as "at this stage he hadn't seen him" or "this was before he was prophet and he hadn't seen the Lord yet." I wanted to point out that he never claimed he had, that no apostle had made this claim for over 100 years (I think Lorenzo Snow was perhaps the last one).

I mentioned this to a friend after the class quietly. He smiled and said, "thank goodness. Imagine the minefield and embarrassment if our leaders were frequently claiming visits by deity/angels. My colleagues think we're mad enough already."
Actually, Joseph F. Smith was the last one that I'm aware of (see D&C 138), but I agree with your friend's "thank goodness" comment.

User avatar
On Own Now
Posts: 1759
Joined: 18 Jan 2012, 12:45

Re: The Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad day

Post by On Own Now » 21 Jan 2014, 07:18

mackay11 wrote:Priesthood just annoyed me. JSF wrote a letter in 1948 to his son saying he had never had a vision of the Lord. But the teacher and class members kept referring to it as "at this stage he hadn't seen him" or "this was before he was prophet and he hadn't seen the Lord yet." I wanted to point out that he never claimed he had, that no apostle had made this claim for over 100 years (I think Lorenzo Snow was perhaps the last one).
BRM April, 1985, certainly seemed to be saying he had never seen the Lord. I remember actually thinking as such at the time:
BRM wrote:I testify that he is the Son of the Living God and was crucified for the sins of the world. He is our Lord, our God, and our King. This I know of myself independent of any other person.

I am one of his witnesses, and in a coming day I shall feel the nail marks in his hands and in his feet and shall wet his feet with my tears.

But I shall not know any better then than I know now that he is God’s Almighty Son, that he is our Savior and Redeemer, and that salvation comes in and through his atoning blood and in no other way. --BRM, April, 1985
It's at about 14:15 of BRM's final conference address: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qn7boTBtn3w
- - -
“Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves.” ― Carl Jung
- - -
"Let us therefore no longer pass judgment on one another, but resolve instead never to put a stumbling block or hindrance in the way of another." ― Romans 14:13
- - -

User avatar
nibbler
Posts: 4452
Joined: 14 Nov 2013, 07:34
Location: Ten miles west of the exact centre of the universe

Re: The Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad day

Post by nibbler » 21 Jan 2014, 08:02

It's interesting that people have that desire to project visions on our prophets and apostles. It reminds me of an experience from my mission. An apostle visited our mission and some missionaries drove him to the meeting. During the ride one of the missionaries had the gumption to ask: Have you seen Jesus? The prophet and apostles probably get this sort of question all the time. In retrospect the apostle's answer was perfect. He just looked at the elder right in the eyes... and didn't say a word.

The missionary came away from the experience with the confirmation that the apostle had personally seen Jesus; that knowing look, the silence meaning it was an experience that was too sacred to talk about. Someone else could have come away from that same experience thinking that the glaring silence translated into "c'mon, I can't believe you are asking me that." Another person might take the silence to mean, "well I guess you haven't then."

The silent stare turned out to be the perfect answer. It allowed the person that asked the question to come up with their own answer based entirely on the faith they had walking into the experience.
mackay11 wrote:But the teacher and class members kept referring to it as "at this stage he hadn't seen him" or "this was before he was prophet and he hadn't seen the Lord yet."
That's too bad. I might be tempted to ask "Is that our takeaway from his comments?" Immediately after claiming he had never received a personal visitation he said "But it is not necessary." It sounds like that message was warped into a personal visitation being very necessary. I should have recognized that as a potential pitfall when reading the lesson beforehand. It never hurts to be prepared.
The wound is the place where the light enters you.
— Rumi

Post Reply