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Re: Thestrals, Dementers, Boggarts and Crises of Faith

Posted: 05 Feb 2015, 14:18
by West
I love Harry Potter, and a lot of it has to do with how the story is pretty much about how different people handle loss -- it's about what happens when Voldemort loses his humanity, when Harry Potter loses almost everyone he loves dearly, when Snape loses the object of his intense obsessive love, when Dumbledore loses the people he cherishes. It's about loss and still managing to be good and brave and strong and not letting our losses define our lives, and I think that the story really can be a great source of comparisons for those going through their FC and their faith transitions.

I definitely appreciate any awesome analogies using that series, and I haven't seen this before, so thanks for bringing it back up. ^^

Re: Thestrals, Dementers, Boggarts and Crises of Faith

Posted: 05 Feb 2015, 14:32
by mom3
Ray - This will go down as one of my all time favorites of yours. Still love it. Thanks for bringing it forward. Dementers are all around us.

Now off for some chocolate.

Re: Thestrals, Dementers, Boggarts and Crises of Faith

Posted: 03 Oct 2015, 18:33
by Curt Sunshine
For some reason, this post came strongly into my mind as I listened to a talk during the Priesthood session this evening.

Remembering this analogy brought me peace as I disagreed with the person speaking. I hope it helps someone now who might not have read it previously - or even someone who already has.

Re: Thestrals, Dementers, Boggarts and Crises of Faith

Posted: 03 Oct 2015, 21:29
by amateurparent
Thank you for sharing. Excellently written piece.

In the past, when I brought up religious issues which were essentially, "But what about the thestrals?", too often I received odd looks and a stoney silence. As the years have gone by, this slow learner finally figured out it was best to not mention the therstrals. People were either going to see them or not.

A focus on kindness and connection to people goes further.

Re: Thestrals, Dementers, Boggarts and Crises of Faith

Posted: 02 Oct 2016, 14:53
by Curt Sunshine
mom3's comment about leaders not really understanding faith crises brought this post again to my mind.

Most of you have read it already, so I hope it helps someone who hasn't - perhaps only someone who lurks but doesn't comment.

Re: Thestrals, Dementers, Boggarts and Crises of Faith

Posted: 08 Oct 2016, 09:20
by SilentDawning
The advantage of aging is that you can re-read posts that are vaguely familiar and enjoy them as a new experience all over again. I enjoyed reading this. I think it describes a lot of the things we experience in a faith crisis. The fact that I watched a Harry Potter movie last night helps.

The people who can see Thestrals are simply empaths who have experienced the faith crisis, or at least, can see the others' point of view. It explains why many leaders dismiss us as apostates, as having "lost our way", as perhaps sinning in certain area of our lives, darkening our minds....they haven't experienced what we have experienced. I know, from a friend, that they speak negatively about me in their PEC meetings. If they had my point of view, even if they didn't agree with how I act it out, they might be more compassionate.

I also think the people who are so focused on grief have trouble seeing the good in the Church. I know I have been guilty of that, and very negative at times. It's part of the grief recovery cycle that is well explained on the internet -- starting with denial, anger, and eventually acceptance (if I have it right). The problem is when we stay angry forever. Fortunately, I feel "over" any anger now that I have made my peace with the Church, and have "put it in its rightful place" in my life. And I see the good in it. My wife and daughter love the church and get happiness from it. Their experience is not mine, so I support it and see the happiness it brings them, particularly my daughter.

The Boggarts -- not sure about that one. Perhaps I lack empathy due to no extended family to worry about judging me (I have some, but I don't care what they think as they are not my biological parents, they are in-laws). A lot of people are afraid of what their family will say when they reveal their unorthodoxy or lack of belief. Perhaps that is the kind of fear addressed in the opening post. I am not sure that laughing at it is the way to handle it -- but I do agree that not taking things too seriously is important. Letting things just roll off your back when they come up at church. Turn your back on the Boggart while you picture it in a bikini. :smile:

Re: Thestrals, Dementers, Boggarts and Crises of Faith

Posted: 14 Apr 2018, 12:52
by Curt Sunshine
I want to bump up this thread for the new participants lately, since it deals directly with quite a few newer threads.

After reading it, consider the following:

Debating with someone who is blind about something that requires sight is pointless - but it also is uncharitable, since it has no possible outcome except contention, pity, anger, condescension, etc. If someone can't see something, they won't see it simply because someone else does.

Re: Thestrals, Dementers, Boggarts and Crises of Faith

Posted: 16 Apr 2018, 10:19
by nibbler
Curt Sunshine wrote:
14 Apr 2018, 12:52
Debating with someone who is blind about something that requires sight is pointless - but it also is uncharitable, since it has no possible outcome except contention, pity, anger, condescension, etc. If someone can't see something, they won't see it simply because someone else does.
To get meta...

I think a lot of the issue has to do with people being blind to this observation. I wonder if pointing this out helps them see? ;)

Re: Thestrals, Dementers, Boggarts and Crises of Faith

Posted: 16 Apr 2018, 20:18
by longbottom
Curt Sunshine wrote:
14 Apr 2018, 12:52
After reading it, consider the following:

Debating with someone who is blind about something that requires sight is pointless - but it also is uncharitable, since it has no possible outcome except contention, pity, anger, condescension, etc. If someone can't see something, they won't see it simply because someone else does.
This is an astute observation. I agree that is a disservice to everyone involved trying to explain something unexplainable to the unseeing.