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Finding Eternal Truths in Classic Literature: A Conversation with Author S. Michael Wilcox

Posted: 20 Mar 2019, 03:32
by SamBee

Now having read a lot and traveled and being introduced to different cultures, I would say God has many voices and He’s been speaking to His children in every way He can—all the time, everywhere.

If we put that in our minds as the assumption, instead of the assumption of He spoke to the Old Testament prophets, Book of Mormon, the Savior, and then we have the Restoration and few reformers here and there. If we would just realize that He doesn't always speak with just apostles and prophets. If you can’t hear a prophet or apostle for whatever reason, maybe you can hear the words of a sage in China, or a philosopher, or an author, a playwright, a poet, a musician, an artist, scientists. As soon as I put into my mind that God speaks, God has been speaking and speaks all the time, everywhere, in many different ways, then I’m looking for it.
http://www.ldsliving.com/Finding-Eterna ... ox/s/90478

Re: Finding Eternal Truths in Classic Literature: A Conversation with Author S. Michael Wilcox

Posted: 20 Mar 2019, 07:24
by Minyan Man
I like this interview a lot. There is one quote I especially like,
I think sometimes we narrow down our voices of God. In other words, God's voice for me earlier in my life was the prophets and apostles, the scriptures, general conference...Now having read a lot and traveled and being introduced to different cultures, I would say God has many voices and He's been speaking to His children in every way He can--all the time, everywhere.

Re: Finding Eternal Truths in Classic Literature: A Conversation with Author S. Michael Wilcox

Posted: 20 Mar 2019, 08:56
by Roy
Once you start looking for it I just find it everywhere. It's like an orchestra. Apostles and prophets, they have a sweet sound, but there are woodwinds, brass, and various kinds of strings and God just plays them all. He just orchestrates them all so that goodness, truth, and beauty come to man in every way He can get it down to us.
Lots of great stuff. We talk about Elder Worthlin's orchestra example. Here this same concept is broadened to all of humanity. The Mormons are needed and serve a purpose in the grand symphony - as do every other group and philosophy.

I also like the principle that fictional works can be enlightening and enobling. It can be scripture in that we can hear God's voice in it. I believe this is one way to deal with the possibility of the BoM not being of ancient origen but still being scripture.

Re: Finding Eternal Truths in Classic Literature: A Conversation with Author S. Michael Wilcox

Posted: 20 Mar 2019, 12:11
by Minyan Man
Roy wrote:
20 Mar 2019, 08:56
I also like the principle that fictional works can be enlightening and enobling. It can be scripture in that we can hear God's voice in it. I believe this is one way to deal with the possibility of the BoM not being of ancient origen but still being scripture.
Many of the parables in scripture are technically fictional stories teaching spiritual lessons.
I believe that there are events we remember over time that have a spiritual lessons that are designed specifically for us, individually.
(Does that make any sense?)

Re: Finding Eternal Truths in Classic Literature: A Conversation with Author S. Michael Wilcox

Posted: 20 Mar 2019, 14:42
by Roy
Minyan Man wrote:
20 Mar 2019, 12:11
I believe that there are events we remember over time that have a spiritual lessons that are designed specifically for us, individually.
(Does that make any sense?)
I read that to mean that there may be life events that provide pivotal lessons at important milestones in our life (or maybe the lesson was not clear at the time but looking back in hindsight the lesson is more apparent). Is that what you are saying MM?

If so, the Author S. Michael Wilcox talks about reading of powerful experiences in literature and experiencing them vicariously to a degree. He feels that he was partially prepared for the emotions of grief that accompanied the death of his wife because he had experienced great loss vicariously through the characters in great works of literature.

Interesting concept!

Re: Finding Eternal Truths in Classic Literature: A Conversation with Author S. Michael Wilcox

Posted: 20 Mar 2019, 15:11
by Minyan Man
Roy wrote:
20 Mar 2019, 14:42
I read that to mean that there may be life events that provide pivotal lessons at important milestones in our life (or maybe the lesson was not clear at the time but looking back in hindsight the lesson is more apparent). Is that what you are saying MM?
Yes, that is what I mean.

Re: Finding Eternal Truths in Classic Literature: A Conversation with Author S. Michael Wilcox

Posted: 25 Mar 2019, 16:08
by mom3
Great interview. Pushing water down the rows is hard. LDS Living seems to keep pushing. I like that.

Re: Finding Eternal Truths in Classic Literature: A Conversation with Author S. Michael Wilcox

Posted: 17 Apr 2019, 21:18
by Daughter1
I need to go to bed, but I am so excited to read this interview tomorrow. I have half-joked over the past couple of decades that I have two quad combinations: the "standard works" and my copy of LotR and The Hobbit. And that I would be hard-pressed to say which is more dear to me. More recently (7 years or so ago now), I saw a quote from the Dalai Lama. It hangs on my wall, and if it were't too long it would be my signature here:
All religions share a common root, which is limitless compassion. They emphasize human improvement, love, respect for others, and compassion for the suffering of others. In so far as love is essential in every religion, we could say that love is a universal religion. But the various techniques and methods for developing love differ widely between the traditions. I don't think there could ever be just one single philosophy or one single religion. Since there are so many different types of people, with a range of tendencies and inclinations, it is quite fitting that there are differences between religions. And the fact that there are so many different descriptions of the religious path shows how rich religion is.
Actually, just typing it out again, I think I decided my favorite part of the quote which might be short enough. :)

Re: Finding Eternal Truths in Classic Literature: A Conversation with Author S. Michael Wilcox

Posted: 18 Apr 2019, 11:56
by Curt Sunshine
We say we beleive there are virtuous, praiseworthy, lovely, good things outside of our religion and that we seek after them. We also are told to seek wisdom and learning out of the best books.

I think of Les Miserables, for example. SO much eternal truth I wish we understood better, collectively.

Re: Finding Eternal Truths in Classic Literature: A Conversation with Author S. Michael Wilcox

Posted: 18 Apr 2019, 13:03
by SamBee
Curt Sunshine wrote:
18 Apr 2019, 11:56
We say we beleive there are virtuous, praiseworthy, lovely, good things outside of our religion and that we seek after them. We also are told to seek wisdom and learning out of the best books.

I think of Les Miserables, for example. SO much eternal truth I wish we understood better, collectively.
I see that book as essentially about forgiveness. At what point can we forgive and when should we?