Can God really hold us accountable for anything?

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LookingHard
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Re: Can God really hold us accountable for anything?

Post by LookingHard » 30 Dec 2017, 08:55

I heard that someone had studied how people viewed God. They found that if your parents were generally quite loving, you generally believe in a God of Love. If you had very judgmental/mean parents, you generally feed God is judgmental/mean.

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dande48
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Re: Can God really hold us accountable for anything?

Post by dande48 » 30 Dec 2017, 09:36

LookingHard wrote:
30 Dec 2017, 08:55
I heard that someone had studied how people viewed God. They found that if your parents were generally quite loving, you generally believe in a God of Love. If you had very judgmental/mean parents, you generally feed God is judgmental/mean.
I strongly believe this; Humans imprinting on God based on their experiences with their parents. It makes me very uncertain that anyone has the slightest clue as to what God is really like. It feels like there's too much "God is whoever I believe, and approves of whatever I say." I'd be willing to bet, 500 years from now, humanity's views on God would be downright revolting by today's standards, just as our views on God would be just as revolting to our ancestors.
Last edited by dande48 on 30 Dec 2017, 20:56, edited 1 time in total.
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Gerald
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Re: Can God really hold us accountable for anything?

Post by Gerald » 30 Dec 2017, 12:04

The whole notion of "fulfilling the measure of our creation" would seem to imply that judgment will vary from person to person. Each individual will be held accountable for different things. This is why a "checklist" of commandments doesn't make much sense to me. Yes, of course, we should not kill and yet, soldiers and police (and others) do and are judged differently because of context. I don't know how that translates in terms of "eternal rewards." I'd like to think that if such rewards exist, that all will be content with that reward, whatever it is.

Many years ago, I watched an old British comedy from the seventies called "Bless Me, Father" which concerned the serenely comic misadventures of an older priest and his young curate. In one episode, this priest and his curate briefly debate the existence of hell. (The comedy is set in the 1940s, preVatican II, I think). The curate says somewhat indignantly, "So you don't believe in hell?" The priest replies, "On the contrary, like every good Catholic, I believe in the reality of hell. But only a maniac would believe that there will actually be anyone there."

I don't know how doctrinally sound (within Mormonism or Catholicism) such a statement is but,oddly, I found it a comforting idea.
So through the dusk of dead, blank-legended And unremunerative years we search to get where life begins, and still we groan because we do not find the living spark where no spark ever was; and thus we die, still searching, like poor old astronomers who totter off to bed and go to sleep, to dream of untriangulated stars.
---Edwin Arlington Robinson---

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