Unorthodox Answers

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RiverSong14
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Unorthodox Answers

Post by RiverSong14 » 23 Jul 2014, 07:44

Has anyone ever had personal revelation that was not in line with the handbook or common beliefs taught in the church and when you followed it, the results were beneficial and it seemed they were guided by God? Have you ever suffered retribution from members for doing so?

Curt Sunshine
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Re: Unorthodox Answers

Post by Curt Sunshine » 23 Jul 2014, 09:36

Yes, I have had personal revelation that was not in line with general guidelines / policies / practices.

It depends on what you mean by "retribution". I have had people not understand and disagree with me; I have had members tell me I was wrong; I have been told I shouldn't believe or do something. However, retribution usually means "retaliation" and implies a response to something I have done TO someone else that harms them in some way - so I don't think it applies to the things I have done and said.
I see through my glass, darkly - as I play my saxophone in harmony with the other instruments in God's orchestra. (h/t Elder Joseph Wirthlin)

Even if people view many things differently, the core Gospel principles (LOVE; belief in the unseen but hoped; self-reflective change; symbolic cleansing; striving to recognize the will of the divine; never giving up) are universal.

"For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong." H. L. Mencken

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Forgotten_Charity
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Re: Unorthodox Answers

Post by Forgotten_Charity » 23 Jul 2014, 10:05

Ya umm, that's kind of my life story. As a result I spends life protecting and friendships my those in various cultures that are or have been as well.

Roy
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Re: Unorthodox Answers

Post by Roy » 23 Jul 2014, 15:29

My "revelation" experience was basically that I am accepted by God. I imagine it to be similar to the "Your sins are forgiven thee" moment experienced by many people throughout history.

It has caused me to to be much less concerned about self perfection and much more accepting of myself as a beautifully flawed and dynamic masterpiece in progress.

I now place less emphasis on "small stuff" (like holding a TR) that others believe is vitally important.

I am open to the possibility that my revelation came from within my deepest needs - but my perspective is permanently changed regardless.

I do get responses of disaproval from some - but the beauty of my position is that the approval of others is likewise less important than it once was.
"It is not so much the pain and suffering of life which crushes the individual as it is its meaninglessness and hopelessness." C. A. Elwood

“It is not the function of religion to answer all the questions about God’s moral government of the universe, but to give one courage, through faith, to go on in the face of questions he never finds the answer to in his present status.” TPC: Harold B. Lee 223

"I struggle now with establishing my faith that God may always be there, but may not always need to intervene" Heber13

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Orson
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Re: Unorthodox Answers

Post by Orson » 23 Jul 2014, 17:11

Not my personal experience but I thought this story relates to your first question very well.

http://janariess.religionnews.com/2014/ ... te-anyone/
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I first found faith, and thought I had all truth. I then discovered doubt, and claimed a more accurate truth. Now I’ve greeted paradox and a deeper truth than I have ever known.

RiverSong14
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Re: Unorthodox Answers

Post by RiverSong14 » 24 Jul 2014, 10:58

Thanks for your responses everyone, and I loved the article you shared Orson. I had a bishop like that in a singles ward I was in years ago. He never got released after serving for years. His "release" was a heart attack in the night, and I have never been to a funeral with so many people. He was the most non-judgmental, and loving man. I have realized recently that repressing personal revelation, just because it wasn't exactly in line with the common belief or teachings of the church, has been a huge cause of my anxiety issues. It was a bold move for me to finally say out loud to God that I just want to know the truth and to follow it no matter the costs, and I have stuck to that. I have had death anxiety ever since my son died five years ago. I couldn't figure out why, after all, I had the gospel, right? I was going to the temple and doing all the list of things I was supposed to be doing, but I felt like I was missing something. Now I know. It was my constant efforts to turn off my conscience, or intuition, or the Spirit...whatever you want to call it. My inner voice was being ignored out of fear of being deemed "unworthy" from my husband, family, and other members. I wanted validation more than I wanted to do what was right. Even though I do not see things in such an orthodox way anymore, I have felt that fear slip away, and it is amazing! Sometime I may share what my "unorthodox" answers have been, but I am not sure I am ready yet. It's a great story, but a long one. Again, thank you for the great advice and feedback!

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DarkJedi
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Re: Unorthodox Answers

Post by DarkJedi » 24 Jul 2014, 12:18

Orson wrote:Not my personal experience but I thought this story relates to your first question very well.

http://janariess.religionnews.com/2014/ ... te-anyone/
Like! :thumbup:
In the absence of knowledge or faith there is always hope.

Once there was a gentile...who came before Hillel. He said "Convert me on the condition that you teach me the whole Torah while I stand on one foot." Hillel converted him, saying: That which is despicable to you, do not do to your fellow, this is the whole Torah, and the rest is commentary, go and learn it."

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Sheldon
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Re: Unorthodox Answers

Post by Sheldon » 25 Jul 2014, 16:06

See Denver Snuffer as the poster boy for somebody who’s personal revelation when contrary to the church, and he suffered retribution.

Curt Sunshine
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Re: Unorthodox Answers

Post by Curt Sunshine » 25 Jul 2014, 18:45

It wasn't Snuffer's personal revelation that got him excommunicated. It was repeatedly calling the LDS Church and its leadership apostate and scheduling a speaking tour to promote that claim. HUGE difference.

Snuffer, at the end, was the perfect example of real apostasy.
I see through my glass, darkly - as I play my saxophone in harmony with the other instruments in God's orchestra. (h/t Elder Joseph Wirthlin)

Even if people view many things differently, the core Gospel principles (LOVE; belief in the unseen but hoped; self-reflective change; symbolic cleansing; striving to recognize the will of the divine; never giving up) are universal.

"For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong." H. L. Mencken

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SilentDawning
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Re: Unorthodox Answers

Post by SilentDawning » 26 Jul 2014, 08:18

I have a had a few. For example, I felt it was right for my wife to go out to work rather than stay at home with my daughter as a baby and toddler. I won't go into why, but I felt it was very necessary. My daughter was raised in a Montessori school during the day, and she blossomed. She is a pillar of organization as a result, loves sorting, organizing, cleaning -- and she is extremely well-adjusted and confident. We got a lot of flack about this -- at least, my wife did -- but we kept on doing it. It worked out great.

I realize that in recent decades there is less emphasis on having a lot of children and the woman staying at home, but at the time, it was very much part of the culture, and my wife in particular suffered for it.
"It doesn't have to be about the Church (church) all the time!" -- SD

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A man asked Jesus "do all roads lead to you?" Jesus responds,”most roads don’t lead anywhere, but I will travel any road to find you.” Adapted from The Shack, William Young

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